Books by Elissa Brent Weissman

THE LENGTH OF A STRING by Elissa Brent Weissman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2018

"Still, readers will enjoy this trip through time in a notable new transracial-adoption narrative. (Fiction. 10-14) "
Twelve-year-old Imani, a black girl adopted into a white Jewish family, struggles to negotiate her understanding of identity and place while also untangling the skein of her great-grandma's legacy. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 4, 2017

"Good for aspiring writers and artists. (Collective memoir. 8-12)"
Twenty-six notable authors and illustrators of children's books—including the book's editor—introduce themselves via their childhood memories. Read full book review >
NERD CAMP 2.0 by Elissa Brent Weissman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 6, 2014

"Obvious and preachy, this camp story is nothing worth writing home about. (Fiction. 9-12)"
The war between nerds and jocks is on in Weissman's follow-up to Nerd Camp (2011). Read full book review >
THE SHORT SELLER by Elissa Brent Weissman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 7, 2013

"While the slow start and trappings of finance culture will deter some readers, those who are drawn in by Lindy's passion and the fun math puzzles will be rewarded by a startlingly suspenseful conclusion, with far more at stake than mere classroom drama. (Fiction. 11-12)"
A seventh-grader plays the stock market. Read full book review >
NERD CAMP by Elissa Brent Weissman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 24, 2011

"This celebration of summer camp and geekiness tries too hard. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Gabe is torn between his enthusiasm for a summer residential program for gifted children and his fear that his new, cool stepbrother-to-be will find out he's a nerd. Read full book review >
THE TROUBLE WITH MARK HOOPER by Elissa Brent Weissman
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2009

Not every amusing concept yields a correspondingly amusing novel. Case in point: a story in which the main characters have the same name, have sisters with the same name, live in the same town and are in the same grade at the same school. The two Mark Geoffrey Hoppers cause all sorts of problems at school: schedule snafus, mixed-up party invitations, confusion over picking teams and the challenge of starting in a new school with one bad Mark against you from the outset. Worse than the infantile, middle-school name-calling—spitwad, fartbrain and diaper breath—is dialogue tedious from the beginning: " ‘Thanks,' said Mark. / ‘Yeah,' said Mark. / ‘That's a good place to start,' Mark said quietly." Or such lines as, "Mark crossed his arms. When you mess with Mark Geoffrey Hopper, he thought, you mess with Mark Geoffrey Hopper." Though there is some character development and bad Mark Hopper gradually becomes less annoying, the novel never does. (Fiction. 9-12)Read full book review >
STANDING FOR SOCKS by Elissa Brent Weissman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 24, 2009

While social activism arguably deserves promotion, this well-intentioned narrative provides only lackluster support for its cause. Environmentalist Fara Ross is famous for her unusual socks and decides to continue this fashion tradition when she campaigns for sixth-grade class president. Her catchy slogan, "Vote for Fara and School Won't Sock," garners support, but Fara struggles when her colorful clothing consumes her identity. When other classmates voice their objections to footwear, Fara organizes the First Sockinental Congress to provide a forum for supporters, though Fara's friendships and campaign suffer as her priorities change. Unfortunately, Fara's self-righteousness will do little to inspire readers. "Fara had resolutely continued to build her reputation as the forward-thinking student who got things accomplished. If someone else in her class was dedicated to causes, Fara wondered why she had yet to meet her..." Repetitive jokes fall flat, dialogue is often dated and contrived characterization stunts this formulaic plot. While there are some memorable moments as Fara matures, the agenda-laden message makes for a didactic debut. (Fiction. 9-12)Read full book review >