Books by Greg Johnson

THE JOURNAL OF JOYCE CAROL OATES by Joyce Carol Oates
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 2, 2007

"'Love. Friendship. Art. Work. These are my values,' Oates says. Watching her juggle them in these replete pages is a stimulating experience."
Tensions between public image and private self are engagingly acknowledged and analyzed in illuminating excerpts from journals begun during the second decade of this prolific author's remarkable career. Read full book review >
STICKY KISSES by Greg Johnson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Witty, poignant, and true."
Atlanta-based author Johnson (Pagan Babies, 1993; stories: I Am Dangerous, 1996) returns to familiar themes with a southern family brought together, transformed, and in part destroyed by AIDS. Read full book review >
INVISIBLE WRITER by Greg Johnson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 2, 1998

"This life of talent dutifully plied, sustained, and rewarded offers less drama and excitement than any of the tales Oates has concocted in her fiction."
An authorized portrait of the intensely prolific novelist as an artist and a person. Read full book review >
I AM DANGEROUS by Greg Johnson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 16, 1996

"Exceptionally strong, confident writing from an author who shows his literary roots while gracefully blending ancient anxieties and modern concerns."
A third collection from Johnson (Distant Friends, 1990, etc.) offers 13 tight, knowing, well-told stories. Read full book review >
PAGAN BABIES by Greg Johnson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 1993

"The voices of gossiping schoolgirls reappear throughout Johnson's debut novel and set the tone: the fascinating sense of knowing intimate secrets about someone in spite of having little personal connection."
Johnson's first novel after story collections (Distant Friends; A Friendly Deceit) follows two childhood friends to adulthood; here, unappealing characters engage in part because they seem so real, in part because the author's obvious concern for them rubs off. Read full book review >