Books by H.A. Rey

CURIOUS GEORGE SAYS THANK YOU by H.A. Rey
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 6, 2012

"If the curious protagonist in this story were reading his own tale on an iPad, he might get a little bored. (iPad storybook app, 3-6)"
This "multi-touch" children's book aims to minimize distraction, but in the process, it ultimately neutralizes the power of the medium. Read full book review >
CURIOUS GEORGE GOES TO THE HOSPITAL by H.A. Rey
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 25, 1966

The nicest thing about the Curious George books is that while beginning readers are convinced that they are just enjoying themselves with George, their supervising adults are equally sure that they are learning something. Both are absolutely right. This time around George's insatiable curiosity lands him in the hospital. He swallowed a piece of a jigsaw puzzle, and kept this as an inside secret until the man in the yellow hat took the distressed George to the hospital. Here, all of the hospital routines, from getting into bed to being taken to surgery are illustrated and described. George goes from being uncharacteristically subdued to a convalescence that is contagiously funny. The book was written in collaboration with the Children's Hospital Medical Center of Boston. If your reader must be prepped for surgery, let George do it. Read full book review >
CURIOUS GEORGE LEARNS THE ALPHABET by H.A. Rey
ANIMALS
Released: March 21, 1963

The alphabet is introduced to Curious George, an old favorite, and to the readers with the shapes of letters (upper and lower case) being discovered in the shapes of animals and things. This is further re-enforced by the sounds of the letters being brought out by the names of the items illustrated and then combined into simple words. Read full book review >
CURIOUS GEORGE GETS A MEDAL by H.A. Rey
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 12, 1957

The fourth book about Curious George and his anthrapoid antics concerns the mysterious letter which came for him. George couldn't read, but maybe he could write a reply. In the attempt he spilled ink on the floor. Then a box of soap flakes poured into the ink to clean it produced tons of bluish lather. Borrowing a pump George caused havoc at a farm and a zoo. But he redeemed himself before the finale by proving himself a champ chimp when he realized that the letter was from a scientist asking George to become the first space monkey. George complies and wins a medal. Read full book review >
SEE THE CIRCUS by H.A. Rey
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: Sept. 26, 1956

Rhymes and colored pictures, that fold open to reveal an extension of the original scene, give the young a provocative meeting with big top characters. Each verse is something to guess at- what will Kiki the clown do, who will walk the tight-rope and so forth. The author's pictures are in the agreeably loose style of the illustrations for the Curious George books. Cloth spine with stapled pages. Not too firm. Read full book review >
FIND THE CONSTELLATIONS by H.A. Rey
Released: June 15, 1954

An excellent introduction to the heavens, to satisfy and stimulate a child's interest. Known primarily for the Curious George and other picture books, H. A. Rey is a scientist too and offers his method of star study with a practical clarity. Familiar constellations are named and identified with interstellar lines drawn to make the figures. Seasonal panoramas of northern hemisphere skies place the stars and planets in relationship to each other and as the need arises, the physical facts-light years, planetary orbits, magnitudes and so forth- are explained. Index, sky schedules, bibliography, handiness for outdoor use, and the author's explicit, striking two tones are the further virtues of a very useful book. Read full book review >
CURIOUS GEORGE RIDES A BIKE by H.A. Rey
Released: June 15, 1952

Beginning readers and their younger brothers and sisters can follow the beloved monkey's funny string of adventures through Mr. Rey's profusion of colorful cartoons. George, his curiosity to the fore, is ecstatic with the new bike his owner has given him. He helps the newsboy deliver papers, then makes boats of the rest of the papers to sail in a stream. Enthralled with his handiwork, George absentmindedly bangs up his front wheel and through a new set of ingeniously interrelating circumstances, gets coralled by a visiting circus and ends as star of the animal show that evening. Read full book review >
BILLY'S PICTURE by H.A. Rey
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 4, 1947

A nonsense story of a little rabbit who wanted to draw a picture but couldn't draw what he wanted to because all the other animals — a puppy, a goose, a porcupine, a rooster, an owl, a mouse, and an elephant — insisted on adding their own ideas of how the picture should look. When they all decide to draw pictures of themselves, Billy the Bunny is able to do his own portrait. Read full book review >
CURIOUS GEORGE TAKES A JOB by H.A. Rey
Released: June 15, 1947

Another story about the curious monkey, and his adventures. He steals the keeper's key, makes his escape, and has all sorts of things happen to him in the city. After abandoning a dish washing job he took on skyscraper window cleaning, but what went on behind the windows proved his undoing. He's recaptured- and makes Hollywood. Nonsense with entertaining action text and pictures that tell their own story. Read full book review >
PRETZEL AND THE PUPPIES by Margret Rey
Released: Sept. 11, 1946

Pretzel was enormously popular- and "funnies" are the problem children of today's parents (who want to call a halt on their consumption but know of no wise method for so doing). The Reys, husband and wife (Margret and H.A.) have produced this time a comic strip sequel to Pretzel, in which the adventures of this longest of all dachshunds prove again that though he is "so long" he is not always "so smart". Nonsense in good natured vein. Read full book review >
SPOTTY by H.A. Rey
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 7, 1945

A delightful picture book for any age from three up. There's plain delight in story and pictures — and a moral if you want it. Spotty, a brown and white bunny in a peaceful white and pink warren suffers loneliness when his family label him queer. He leaves home and finds a comfortable, welcome place in a forest of spotted rabbits. He learns, to his surprise, that a lovely pink and white rabbit is as unhappy in this setting as he was in his, and their mutual difficulties are solved with dispatch and joy. This is a sure favorite — both for libraries and bookshop customers. Read full book review >
LOOK FOR THE LETTERS by H.A. Rey
Released: Nov. 7, 1945

Attractive merchandise, keyed to the substantial market seeking gay picture books with an alphabet idea that's fresh and new. H. A. Rey has made a game of it, a game that children who know their letters will be able to play with signboards and large scale lettering anywhere. (The fact that teaching the alphabet to pre-school children is frowned upon in modern educational circles is perhaps outside our province.) This is definitely a picture book with letters as integral parts of the pictures, — amusing, gay, postery type of pictures with lots of humor. Read full book review >
WE THREE KINGS AND OTHER CHRISTMAS CAROLS by H.A. Rey
HOLIDAYS & FESTIVALS
Released: Nov. 8, 1944

A cheery selection of old, familiar and favorite Christmas carols, 10 in all, song and decorations on one page, and, facing it, illustrated full page of music, in which the notes are exchanged for tiny pictures to fit the carol. It is full of the Christmas spirit and there's a chuckle on each picture page; it will be fun for family sings. All juvenile markets. Read full book review >
THE PARK BOOK by H.A. Rey
Released: Oct. 25, 1944

First class primer material dealing with thoroughly familiar scenes, people and activities of any city children whose playtime takes them to a city park. (My guess is that Washington Square, New York, has been used). But everywhere, children ill find the ice cream man, the balloon man, the shoe shiner, the mothers and nurses wit hildren, the pigeons and sparrows and squirrels, the park cleaner, the old man with the of food, the playgrounds with swings and seesaws and other small boys and girls, the oond where boats can be sailed. A book that could be used with pre—school children or given to first grders as a primer. Read full book review >
PRETZEL by H.A. Rey
illustrated by H.A. Rey, by Margret Rey
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1944

H.A. Rey has done the pictures — double spreads accompanied by expanded caption text — for a story of Pretzel, a dachshund who was proud of his excessive length until a lady dachshund failed to appreciate him. None of the gifts he offered proved effective, until his length made possible a rescue that another dachshund could not have achieved. So in the end, Greta accepted him, despite his length. Read full book review >
POETRY
Released: Nov. 3, 1943

Remember Au Clair de la Lune (published by Greystone and out of print, unfortunately)? This is a companion volume, and the sample pages available at time of writing, indicate that it fills a real need. Good assortment of familiar nursery rhymes and singable melodies, lavishly illustrated in full color. Boards. Read full book review >
WHERE'S MY BABY? by H.A. Rey
FICTION
Released: Oct. 19, 1943

Companion volume to Anybody At Home? — but not as successful a book — or could it be, perhaps, that the idea, once or twice or three times seen, becomes stale? I felt that the drawings were not as good, and the human figures were particularly bad. However, small fry like the recognition element of the surprise feature in the book, and where's a definite vocabulary building factor in identification of the young of the animal world as pictures of a horse, a hen, a sheep, a duck, etc. open up to show a colt, chickens, lambs, and so on. There's one inaccuracy which will prove a hurdle for mothers to take, in that the "verse" that goes with the hen and chickens picture refers to "one to ten" baby chicks, and there are nineteen. Try to explain that to a four year old who is learning to count! Read full book review >
TOMMY HELPS, TOO by H.A. Rey
Released: June 15, 1943

A paper covered toy book with pictures in full color, which tells how Tommy saves sorap metal, rubber, old stockings, and even takes care of the baby to help in the war effort. There are eight pictures on heavy paper slides which pull out to show Tommy's brothers and sister in active service, in their tank, plane, jeep, etc. Expensive for so slight a toy. Read full book review >
DON'T FRIGHTEN THE LION! by H.A. Rey
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 16, 1942

Another book illustrated by the prolific Mr. Rey who has even added a paper-doll dog which can be detached from the back of the front cover. A peedle goes to visit the See with her master but there are signs "No dogs allowed". Refusing to be downed she is dressed up as a little girl and passes through to see the sights. Somehow neither author nor illustrator is up to their excellent best in this. Read full book review >
A CHRISTMAS MANGER by H.A. Rey
RELIGION
Released: Sept. 15, 1942

Another Uncle Gu play book. Remember the farm and circus books in the series? Unusual feature in that no scissors are required for the cut-outs — they are perforated and push out of the sheets. The back of the book makes the stage set. This should be a particularly good Christmas item, and one copy of the book might well be taken over by shop or library and used as display material for a Christmas window, for here is a Christmas creche, with the inside cover the manger and stable, and the animals and figures of the New Testament story on the cut-out pages. Read full book review >
ANYBODY AT HOME? by H.A. Rey
FICTION
Released: Sept. 15, 1942

This is a popular type of book for small fry. The pictures have double exposure, so to speak. Folded, they show one thing, open another. Opposite each picture a guessing riddle in jingle queries what is behind the fold. Turn back the flap of the picture and there it is:- a rabbit (in his hole); a car (in a garage), birds (in their nest), and so on. Pictures in broad sweeps of flat color, a little more stylized than most of Rey's work. Read full book review >
CECILY G. AND THE 9 MONKEYS by H.A. Rey
ANIMALS
Released: June 20, 1942

H. A. Rey was introduced to many American children with Curious George last year. Here is another H. A. Rey picture story book, in which Curious George plays a minor part as one of nine monkeys who found , in a lonely giraffe, a playmate that made up[ for the trees near their old home having been out down. Rey has a fresh approach, originality and a nice sense of fun. Children will love the things that the monkeys did with Cecily — I'd like to do some of them myself. The illustrations, of course, are part and parcel of the whole, and the clear-cut sense of form and color is refreshing after some of the more "arty" picture books of today. Read full book review >
TIT FOR TAT by H.A. Rey
Released: June 15, 1942

Our most prolific author-illustrator gives us another amusing book, this time about Matt who goes to see his Uncle's Turn-A-Vision Set which shows what happens when tit is played for tat. For instance, on the left-hand page you have a picture of a man driving an old victoria, but on the right-hand page you see the horses sitting in the carriage driving the driver, and so forth. It will teach many children how to be kind to animals. Read full book review >
Released: June 15, 1942

A new kind of cut-out-and-play-book (or more accurately, two of them) which should prove a book to parents whose children aren't quite old enough to be trusted with scissors. Here are play books with figures that can be pressed out of the sheets, and folded into shape, Circus figures and "props" for playing circus; farm animals and people and "props" for playing farm, and the outside cover of each book forms a stage-set for the game. The text is simple and factual enough for reading aloud to the small y. Remember The Playbook of The Playbook of Robin Hood, etc. (alas no longer in print)? This is the same sort of idea, less educational in content and purpose, and adapted to much younger children. The circus book is the better of the two, in that the figures are less fragile, ducklings and piglets emerge too small for practical handling. Read full book review >
Released: April 15, 1942

Sheer nonsense and H. A. Rey can swing it. The idea of a carnivorous plant feeling upon insect life appealed to his imagination and he expands the idea to the absordity of the plant becoming really dangerous to humanity, with cannibalistic tendencies, so that it is finally lodged in a zoo. Good fun. Read full book review >
ALL CLAIR DE LA LUNE by H.A. Rey
Released: Sept. 18, 1941

Charming and very original presentation of a good selection of French nursery songs, with amusing layout for musical score,-the notes taking the form of appropriate objects, suggesting the text of the songs. Illustrations in full color. This should prove very useful for nursery schools, kindergartens, etc. Read full book review >
CURIOUS GEORGE by H.A. Rey
illustrated by H.A. Rey
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 17, 1941

This has a primer value too, as the vocabulary is, on the whole, a simple one for beginners, and there is enough repetition, association of action pictures with text, to carry the first year reader over the more difficult words. But five year olds — and even younger — will get some chuckles out of the story of the monkey whose curiosity led to his capture, then to successive adventures en route to New York, and finally to a happy home in the zoo. The artist has a sense of the child's liking for simple form, gay colors, humor and action. A newcomer, for American children, and a find. Read full book review >
HOW DO YOU GET THERE? by H.A. Rey
Released: June 15, 1941

A very good idea, not quite simple enough in development. Pages of the book are folded over so that the answer to the question posed by each picture, is found when the flap of the picture is opened out. Various ways of travel and transportation, including such remote methods as camels and elephants and submarines, and omitting (here is the weakness of the book) automobiles, trains, subways, bicycles. The Rey pictures are gay and amusing, with lots of detail that children enjoy examining. Read full book review >