Books by Ian Tregillis

THE LIBERATION by Ian Tregillis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 6, 2016

"A frighteningly frank and brutal consideration of slavery, post-slavery, and colonialism in metallic garb."
The thoughtful, blood-soaked conclusion to an alternate-history trilogy (The Rising, 2015, etc.) in which the Dutch rule Europe and the New World thanks to their control of Clakkers, mechanical servants fueled by clockwork and alchemy. Read full book review >
THE RISING by Ian Tregillis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"Part 3 can't come too soon."
War overshadows this second volume of an alternate-world trilogy (The Mechanical, 2015) set a few hundred years after the Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens blended clockwork and alchemy to create the robotic Clakkers.Read full book review >
THE MECHANICAL by Ian Tregillis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 10, 2015

"Not quite yet peak Tregillis, but his fans—and other readers with an interest in dark, intelligent fantasy—will find much to admire here."
First of a new fantasy trilogy from the author of the splendid Something More Than Night (2013, etc.).Read full book review >
SOMETHING MORE THAN NIGHT by Ian Tregillis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 3, 2013

"Superlatives seem superfluous. Instead...wow. Just—wow."
New, independent fantasy from the author of the fine Milkweed Triptych (Necessary Evil, 2013, etc.)—and it's a doozy. Read full book review >
NECESSARY EVIL by Ian Tregillis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 30, 2013

"Darkly fascinating, flaws and all: A thoroughly satisfying conclusion to an imaginative tour de force."
Independently intelligible final installment—Tregillis provides an ingenious summary while getting things under way—of the Milkweed Triptych (The Coldest War, 2012, etc.). Read full book review >
THE COLDEST WAR by Ian Tregillis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 17, 2012

"Grim indeed, yet eloquent and utterly compelling."
Independently intelligible sequel to the dark fantasy Bitter Seeds (2010), something like a cross between the devious, character-driven spy fiction of early John le Carré and the mad science fantasy of the X-Men. Read full book review >