Books by J.C. Phillipps

THE SIMPLES LOVE A PICNIC by J.C. Phillipps
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 8, 2014

"A funny family story packed with mayhem and good spirits. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Silly humor abounds as a family tries to enjoy a picnic in the park. Read full book review >
MONKEY ONO by J.C. Phillipps
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 7, 2013

"Everyone loves a beach day, and they'll love Monkey Ono too—Bananza! (Picture book. 2-6)"
Stuffed animal Monkey Ono loves Beach Day (almost as much as making plans…). Read full book review >
WINK: THE NINJA WHO WANTED TO NAP by J.C. Phillipps
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: March 1, 2011

Ah, the price of fame. Repeatedly stymied in his efforts to take a nap by a trio of giggling groupies, the overcaffeinated ninja-turned-circus acrobat who achieved his dream in Wink, the Ninja Who Wanted To Be Noticed (2009) at last enlists similarly black-swathed classmates from the Summer Moon School for Young Ninjas to lead his stalkers off in merry chases for an hour or two. Also returning for this sequel are Wink's wise grandma and frazzled-but-savvy sensei ("One zebra alone is easily seen. A herd creates confusion," he intones. "Why can't Master Zutsu say anything normal? Wink thought. Then he got an idea"). Bright patterns and heavy textures give the paper-collage illustrations a 3D look; borders contain inset illustrations, while full-bleed spreads allow readers to pull back for more expansive views. Phillipps cranks up the visual energy by strewing her brightly lit street scenes with laughing figures, arms and legs flung out joyfully. Like its predecessor, definitely not a snoozer. (Picture book. 5-7)Read full book review >
WINK, THE NINJA WHO WANTED TO BE NOTICED by J.C. Phillipps
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2009

Flamboyant Wink, a flawed but talented young Ninja student, shows that finding one's true calling is as important as working hard. Master Zutzu, his teacher, tells him to practice stealth. "The loudest cricket is the first to be caught," he says, but Wink wonders what's the point of practicing all his fancy Ninja moves if no one's supposed to see them? This is the conflict he works out during meals with his kind grandmother, who attempts to cheer him up with circus tickets. Wink refuses and continues to try harder, but he can't help but show off. One day, he happens to come across a family from the circus who praises his skills and ultimately provides a better forum for his talents. The original subject matter more or less trumps the predictable tone, although the happy ending is somewhat forced. Phillipps shows off her true calling with chunky, bright collages that use dabs of Asian-style prints and bold accents like bamboo stalks that complement the setting and embody Wink's enthusiastic spirit. Better illustrated than plotted, but entertaining and accessible. (Picture book. 3-6)Read full book review >