Books by Jeffrey Rosen

Jeffrey Rosen is a professor of law at George Washington University and the legal affairs editor of The New Republic. He is the author of The Most Democratic Branch, The Naked Crowd, and The Unwanted Gaze. His articles have appeared in many publications,


WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT by Jeffrey Rosen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 20, 2018

"A legal scholar, Rosen sympathizes with Taft's strict constitutionalism more than many readers will, but he makes a convincing case that he was a conscientious president who did his best."
A perceptive biography of William Howard Taft (1857-1930). Read full book review >
LOUIS D. BRANDEIS by Jeffrey Rosen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2016

"A tightly written, tightly reasoned biography aimed at readers who are not legal scholars."
In the latest installment of the publisher's Jewish Lives series, a legal scholar examines the career of Louis D. Brandeis (1856-1941), "the most important American critic of what he called ‘the curse of bigness' in government and business since Thomas Jefferson." Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 9, 2007

"An illuminating look at the human side of the highest court."
Authoritative analysis of how the justices' "quirks of personality and temperament" have shaped American law and made the Court one of our strongest institutions. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 20, 2004

"An extremely readable and handy primer on the pros and cons of surveillance: less a civil liberties screed than a call for simple common sense."
How many cameras have filmed you today? Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: June 1, 2000

"Rosen ably navigates these murky waters where sexual-harassment, libel, and invasion of privacy jurisprudence intersect with the mutated informational boundaries of cyberspace; his debut is a cohesive, attractive, and informative take on a truly unsettling, even grotesque face of contemporary life."
A comprehensive and disturbing assessment of the often well-intentioned legal efforts that have culminated in a multi-pronged assault on civic notions of privacy and discretion—usefully epitomized by the Lewinsky affair. Read full book review >