Books by Jen Bryant

A SPLASH OF RED by Jen Bryant
Released: Jan. 8, 2013

"A splash of vibrancy about a self-taught master. (historical note, author's note, illustrator's note, references) (Picture book/biography. 5-11)"
This outstanding portrait of African-American artist Horace Pippin (1888-1946) allows Pippin's work to shine—and his heart too. Read full book review >
THE FORTUNE OF CARMEN NAVARRO by Jen Bryant
FICTION
Released: Nov. 9, 2010

"Perfectly paced and pulsing with Ryan's increasingly desperate obsession, the tale follows the inevitable trajectory of violence and tragedy, and readers will consume the tale in one hungry gulp. (author's note, bibliography) (Fiction. 12 & up)"
A beautiful green-eyed Gypsy girl with raven-black hair smiles at Ryan Sweeney and gives him a rose as she makes change for his sandwiches at the Quikmart, and it's all downhill for Ryan after that. Read full book review >
KALEIDOSCOPE EYES by Jen Bryant
ADVENTURE
Released: May 12, 2009

"A neat match with Gary Schmidt's The Wednesday Wars (2007) and Michael Kaufman's 1968 (2008). (author's note) (Historical fiction. 9-14)"
When 13-year-old Lyza cleans her grandfather's attic and finds a bundle of papers marked "For Lyza Only," she's propelled into a modern-day search for pirates' treasure. Read full book review >
ABE’S FISH by Jen Bryant
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"A lengthy author's note and bibliography add classroom value to Bryant's earnest and age-appropriate historical fable. (Picture book. 6-10)"
A soldier from the War of 1812 helps young Abe learn a valuable lesson, in this brief tale based on a short passage from Lincoln's first official biography. Read full book review >
A RIVER OF WORDS by Jen Bryant
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

"It is entirely possible that this offering will not only acquaint readers with the man and his poetry but will also inspire creativity—Williams would no doubt be pleased. (timelines, bibliography, author's note, illustrator's note) (Picture book/biography. 8-12)"
With plain words, appropriate to the style of this master of clear and precisely worded poetry, and brilliant images, Bryant and Sweet introduce Williams and his poetry in a fresh, accessible way. Read full book review >
RINGSIDE, 1925 by Jen Bryant
FICTION
Released: Feb. 12, 2008

"Eloquent at times and a natural for the classroom, this is a good match with Ronald Kidd's Monkey Town (2006). (epilogue, author's note, bibliography) (Fiction. 11+)"
In 1925, the leading citizens of Dayton, Tenn., created a media circus to revive the sagging economy of their small town. Read full book review >
PIECES OF GEORGIA by Jen Bryant
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 11, 2006

"The moment in which she finds out who gave her the museum membership is moving and lovely and is the perfect signature on this affecting work of art. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Sometimes novels-in-verse allow a kind of calligraphic freedom of description and emotion, as in this gentle story. Read full book review >
CALL ME MARIANNE by Jen Bryant
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"Though a sample of poetry would have made a better sendoff than Bryant's biographical afterword, this does provide a tantalizing glimpse into one writer's creative process. (Picture book. 7-9)"
A Brooklyn lad finds common ground with an oddly dressed lady in this fictional but not unlikely zoo encounter. Read full book review >
MUSIC FOR THE END OF TIME by Jen Bryant
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"Readers may require WWII explanations. (author's note) (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
Soulful drawings in charcoal and pastel illustrate this poignant bright-spot-in-the-middle-of-war story. Read full book review >
GEORGIA’S BONES by Jen Bryant
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"Not a good introduction or homage to O'Keeffe. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-8)"
This uninspired biography of Georgia O'Keeffe traces the evolution of part of her oeuvre. Read full book review >
THE TRIAL by Jen Bryant
FICTION
Released: March 9, 2004

"An author's note provides such a cogent post-trial follow-up that readers may find themselves wishing the trial itself had been granted a nonfiction treatment rather than being filtered through fiction. (Fiction. 10-14)"
The eponymous trial is that of Bruno Richard Hauptmann, the accused kidnapper of the Lindbergh baby. Read full book review >