Books by Jenny McPhee

THE KREMLIN BALL by Curzio Malaparte
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 13, 2018

"A head-swirling kaleidoscope that, though fictional, is never for a moment fictitious."
The czar is dead. Long live—well, the Stalinist successors of the czar and his court, as proficient as their predecessors at feathering their nests. Read full book review >
NEAPOLITAN CHRONICLES by Anna Maria Ortese
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 13, 2018

"Required reading for Ferrante fans and scholars of Neapolitan literature."
Stories and essays from post-WWII Naples describe the poor and the wealthy alike. Read full book review >
A FAMILY LEXICON by Natalia Ginzburg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 11, 2017

"Ginzburg's 'lexicon' is a valuable addition to an already burnished body of work in translation."
An autobiographical novel from one of Italy's leading postwar writers. Read full book review >
A MAN OF NO MOON by Jenny McPhee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"A sexy but self-conscious recreation of post-World War II European malaise."
In postwar Italy, a renowned poet/translator with suicidal tendencies and an enormous sex drive enjoys a love triangle with two American actresses who happen to be sisters. Read full book review >
NO ORDINARY MATTER by Jenny McPhee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2004

"So absurdly improbable that it can be swallowed whole: a witty spoof, nicely put together and hard to put down."
In a comedy of errors from second-novelist McPhee (The Center of Things, 2001), two sisters set out to dig up a family secret and find that they've struck a mother lode of them. Read full book review >
THE CENTER OF THINGS by Jenny McPhee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 17, 2001

"Likable and harmless: science Nora-Ephronized into generic romance."
A plain, unmarried New York City woman's affections vacillate between the poles of hard science and pop culture—in the first fiction from a translator daughter of John McPhee. Read full book review >