Books by Joan W. Blos

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 8, 2007

"However, Eldora is a likable character and readers will enjoy seeing her find her way in a new city in the process of creating a unique identity. (glossary) (Fiction. 10-14)"
Thirteen-year-old Eldora has moved to San Francisco with her aunt and uncle. Read full book review >
BEDTIME! by Joan W. Blos
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: May 1, 1998

"The pictures are soothing but repetitious; only the conspiratorial tone between the narrator and readers distinguishes this entry from much of the bedtime-story canon. (Picture book. 1-3)"
The setting of this bedtime tale is a clutter-free child's bedroom, where a boy refuses to go to bed but soon admits to his grandmother that one of his three stuffed toys might be sleepy. Read full book review >
NELLIE BLY'S MONKEY by Joan W. Blos
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 1996

"Disappointing. (Picture book. 5+)"
A premise that splits the book's focus and a piece of artistic license that howls for revocation: The story of daredevil journalist and circumnavigator Nellie Bly is told by the monkey she bought en route to Singapore. Read full book review >
THE HUNGRY LITTLE BOY by Joan W. Blos
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1995

"A simple, familiar episode with beginning, middle, and end, plus gentle repetition, it is made for sharing, with opportunities to identify shapes and colors and to count. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A young child closely observes his grandma as she prepares a snack by peeling a carrot, spreading the peanut butter on bread, arranging three cookies and an apple on a plate. Read full book review >
A SEED, A FLOWER, A MINUTE, AN HOUR by Joan W. Blos
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 2, 1992

"This would make an attractive participatory interlude at storytime. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In a 12-line poem that continues in the pattern set in the eponymous first two lines, Blos moves from the literal to the less obvious—either conceptual or poetic—concluding with ``A thought, a poem./A house, a home!'' A page turn between the first and second half of each line turns the verse into an amusing guessing game, especially with the addition of Poppel's vibrant, freely rendered watercolors. Read full book review >