Books by J.T. Petty

THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF WEST by Paul Pope
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

" Forget the capes and tights: this is an entirely accessible and richly imagined superhero tour de force. (Graphic adventure. 13 & up)"
A teenage superheroine vows to destroy the monster that killed her mother but discovers vengeance doesn't come without dire consequences. Read full book review >
THE RISE OF AURORA WEST by Paul Pope
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 30, 2014

"Markedly different than its predecessor but a worthy tale nonetheless. (Graphic adventure. 12 & up)"
Before Battling Boy came to slay the monsters of Arcopolis, Aurora West sought out the monsters that terrorized her city and killed her mother. Read full book review >
THE SQUAMPKIN PATCH by J.T. Petty
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

What happens when you cross a Lemony Snicket title and The Rocky Horror Picture Show? You get this novel about deadly squash-pumpkin hybrids, two unpronounceably surnamed not-quite-orphans' deadly encounters with them and a villain who makes Count Olaf seem benevolent. Goofy action, adventure and comedy ensue after siblings Milton and Chloe Nasselrogt (Nasal Rod to you and me) escape the orphanage to which they're delivered after losing their parents in a department store. Getting out of there is easy compared to what's to follow as they find themselves embroiled in numerous unfortunate events involving a mysteriously vanished child-hating confectioner, his most-despised target, twin nemeses and the aforementioned killer crops. Sharp-eyed readers will note how the illustrations on double-page spreads progress throughout from sprout to monstrous vegetables. Overlong, but loopy fun. Includes a recipe for pumpkin-chocolate-chip cookies. (Fiction. 9-12)Read full book review >
CLEMENCY POGUE by J.T. Petty
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2005

This isn't much of a story, but it has a certain cleverness, and it includes an irresistible scene of a bad little boy tearing apart a set of sofabed cushions, peeing on them, and then being stuck inside the folded, wet and shredded bedding. But we digress. Comprising equal parts Jasper Fforde and Lemony Snicket, the ten-year-old heroine Clemency slaughters an annoying stinging fairy by pulling the Peter Pan line about not believing in fairies. Unfortunately, by dint of repetition, she's killed a handful of other fairies, too. A hobgoblin named Chaphesmeeso (this is a plot point, we swear) gives her the opportunity to make amends in Siberia, Utah and a few other places. The wordplay ranges from adorable to lame ("Clemency was aghast. In fact . . . two ghasts"). Petty is not above snurching from Cyrano de Bergerac (the golden bell hung in my heart poem is straight out of Rostand) nor a little heartfelt preaching: "Reading's human magic." Tasteless and mildly amusing. Try it on the ten-year-olds. (Fiction. 8-12)Read full book review >