Books by Will Davis

MY SIDE OF THE STORY by Will Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 3, 2007

"A first novel featuring a truculent, funny adolescent narrator, one that starts well and that augurs well for the career of its young author (born in 1980), but that eventually succumbs to formula."
A gay British teenager delivers a sniping, witty rant à la Holden Caulfield while undergoing romantic and drug-related misadventures, followed by a mild raft of Life Lessons. Read full book review >
CLEMENCY POGUE: THE HOBGOBLIN PROXY by JT Petty
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2006

This sharp and witty second installment in Petty's series quickly and efficiently brings readers up to speed on Clemency's continuing role in saving the fantastical and vividly drawn world of Make-Believe. Clemency, the intelligent and plucky heroine, partners with Chaphesmeeso, a friendly hobgoblin, and Kennethurchin, a fledgling hobgoblin, to search for Kennethurchin's changeling, Inky, who is his key to full hobgoblin status. However, having lived nine years as a boy, Inky has other ideas, which could spell disaster for Kennethurchin and Make-Believe. Although on Make-Believe's side, Clemency struggles with the idea that ultimately finding Inky means his death and she hatches an alternate plan, executed, but not completely wrapped up, making a tantalizing cliffhanger for the series' third volume. Though a slim text featuring sporadic black-and-white sketches and approachable vocabulary looks younger, heavy topics of mental illness, abandonment and Inky's impending death suit this creative tale for mature readers. (Fiction. 9-12)Read full book review >
CLEMENCY POGUE by J.T. Petty
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2005

This isn't much of a story, but it has a certain cleverness, and it includes an irresistible scene of a bad little boy tearing apart a set of sofabed cushions, peeing on them, and then being stuck inside the folded, wet and shredded bedding. But we digress. Comprising equal parts Jasper Fforde and Lemony Snicket, the ten-year-old heroine Clemency slaughters an annoying stinging fairy by pulling the Peter Pan line about not believing in fairies. Unfortunately, by dint of repetition, she's killed a handful of other fairies, too. A hobgoblin named Chaphesmeeso (this is a plot point, we swear) gives her the opportunity to make amends in Siberia, Utah and a few other places. The wordplay ranges from adorable to lame ("Clemency was aghast. In fact . . . two ghasts"). Petty is not above snurching from Cyrano de Bergerac (the golden bell hung in my heart poem is straight out of Rostand) nor a little heartfelt preaching: "Reading's human magic." Tasteless and mildly amusing. Try it on the ten-year-olds. (Fiction. 8-12)Read full book review >