Books by Judith Inglese

I SEE THE SUN IN THE USA by Dedie King
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 2018

"Well-intended—but woefully inadequate to its task. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The newest in the I See the Sun… series is a paean to American diversity. Read full book review >
I SEE THE SUN IN TURKEY by Dedie King
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 7, 2017

"Emphasizing daily commonalities, this is a useful book on urban Turkish culture. (afterword, glossary) (Informational picture book. 5-7)"
Turkey's political situation is often in the news, but this book focuses mostly on the everyday life of a young child in Istanbul. Read full book review >
I SEE THE SUN IN INDIA by Dedie King
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 20, 2014

"Though it's necessarily oversimplified, it's still a sweet introduction to one part of modern India. (Picture book. 5-8)"
King and Inglese return for the seventh book in their geographical-literacy series for young children, this time visiting India. Read full book review >
I HAVE A FRIEND by Judith Inglese
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 2014

"Aims high but misses. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Staid pictures make a poor match for a child's free-flying introduction to an imaginary friend. Read full book review >
I SEE THE SUN IN MYANMAR/BURMA by Dedie King
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 9, 2013

"Interested teachers and parents will want to use this with young children as one way to introduce children to a way of life that has compassion at its heart. (glossary) (Picture book. 5-8)"
A quietly informative book takes readers through one idealized day in a Burmese village, produced with a text in English and the gracefully written Burmese language. Read full book review >
I SEE THE SUN IN AFGHANISTAN by Dedie King
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2011

Though present in a wistful, ex-soldier uncle who has lost his legs and the arrival of a family of cousins who have lost their home, the war seems far away to young Habiba as she describes a day's routines. She rises before dawn to fetch water, enjoys a breakfast of khojur before helping to get the sheep to pasture and then continues on to an outdoor school. She introduces Aaba (mother), Aata (father) and other members of her family, shares an evening meal, then beds down with her cousins and reflects on how warm and safe she feels. "I am happy to be right here," she concludes. Her narrative, in English and Dari (the local dialect, written in script), accompanies staid collages constructed from painted papers and fuzzed-out color photos and highlighted by the brightly patterned robes and head scarves worn by girls and women. Along with providing background information on setting and local culture, bilingual closing notes identify Habiba and her family as members of the ethnic Hazara minority, but, like other titles in the I See The Sun In… series, this is more about commonalities of feeling and experience than cultural differences. Read full book review >