Books by Julia Woolf

ONE HUG by Katrina Moore
by Katrina Moore, illustrated by Julia Woolf
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 10, 2019

"The book amply demonstrates that 'hugging makes us family.' (Picture book. 2-5)"
One family's reunion is celebrated through many types of hugs. Read full book review >
DUCK AND PENGUIN ARE NOT FRIENDS by Julia Woolf
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2019

"It's not the freshest take on friendship, but the toys bring the point home. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Can these toys get along? Not if they can help it. Read full book review >
PLAY ME SOME MUSIC by Emily Bannister
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2018

"This rousing, upbeat, participatory invitation to make music should entice budding musicians. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Young readers are encouraged to "pick up an instrument and start to play," as "music is magic." Read full book review >
NOT YET ZEBRA by Lou Kuenzler
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 26, 2018

"A cheery run through the ABCs, with a bit of a message about lining up and awaiting one's turn slipped in. (Picture book. 3-5)"
As animals queue up alphabetically to have their portraits painted, pesky Zebra keeps trying to jump the line. Read full book review >
FIVE BLACK CATS by Patricia Hegarty
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"For toddlers unafraid of typical Halloween imagery. (Board book. 2-4)"
A troop of cats traverse a spooky landscape as they make their way to a party hosted by ghosts. Read full book review >
SNOW WONDER by Charles Ghigna
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 28, 2008

Rhyming sentences celebrate the joys of winter, from sledding, skating and building snowmen to baking cookies, sipping cocoa and reading by the fire. Woolf's flat, sharp-edged digital illustrations depict a happy family engaging in all these activities, smiles firmly fixed on faces. The vocabulary is entirely appropriate to the level (Step into Reading 2), although the lockstep rhythm will generate some odd accents to keep the scansion. It's a workmanlike, unassuming contribution to the body of literature for early readers—while it'll get the job done, one wishes it could have been executed with a bit more subtlety, both visually and textually. (Early reader. 4-6)Read full book review >