Books by Kathy Hepinstall

THE BOOK OF POLLY by Kathy Hepinstall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 14, 2017

"Classic elements of Southern comedy—evil twins, people dropping dead, a faith healer, a river-rafting trip—surround a lovable pair of central characters."
This chain-smoking, margarita-swilling, varmint-shooting 68-year-old with secrets in her past is nothing like the other moms in town—and her 10-year-old daughter is terrified of losing her. Read full book review >
SISTERS OF SHILOH by Kathy Hepinstall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2015

"The Hepinstall sisters provide a fascinating glimpse into Civil War life from an unconventional perspective."
Set during the Civil War, this gender-bending novel focuses on two sisters who disguise themselves as men and join the Confederate States Army—and it's written by two sisters. Read full book review >
BLUE ASYLUM by Kathy Hepinstall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 10, 2012

"A fine novel embroidered with rich imagery."
Iris Dunleavy is an abolitionist married to a slaveholder, a sane woman committed to an insane asylum, a married woman falling in love with another man. Read full book review >
PRINCE OF LOST PLACES by Kathy Hepinstall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 6, 2003

"The Sixth Sense meets Thelma and Louise."
A brief but slow-reading third outing by Hepinstall (The Absence of Nectar 2001, etc.) pits maternal love against rational thought. Mom wins. Read full book review >
THE ABSENCE OF NECTAR by Kathy Hepinstall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 10, 2001

"A tone of hysteria rules this dank, claustrophobic story."
Wicked stepfather threatens the lives of an unbearably wise prepubescent girl and her saintly brother: a second novel by Hepinstall that, like her first (The House of Gentle Men, 2000), displays a disquieting view of virile manhood. Read full book review >
THE HOUSE OF GENTLE MEN by Kathy Hepinstall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 8, 2000

"Poetic but slightly creepy and overwritten."
Hepinstall can write lovely lyrical prose, but her first novel bludgeons the reader with obvious imagery to enforce her disturbing, misguided message that every woman is a victim and every redeemable man is a recovering victimizer. Read full book review >