Books by Larry Dark

THE O. HENRY PRIZE STORIES 2002 by Larry Dark
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 27, 2002

Twenty pieces of the year's crop of short fiction that never fail to deliver what is expected but rarely take us anywhere but the expected. Read full book review >
PRIZE STORIES 2001 by Larry Dark
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 4, 2001

"A strong year for the series."
For this year's collection—short fiction's version of the All-Star Team—editor Dark has reduced the number of stories from twenty to seventeen in order to include three lengthier pieces. Read full book review >
PRIZE STORIES 2000 by Larry Dark
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 12, 2000

"The few historical stories, while a welcome change, seem mostly warm-ups for bigger works; in any case, the 80th edition of this fine series serves its basic function: it's a window into the world of contemporary fiction."
Dark's perfunctory introduction to this year's collection is right about one thing: there are a lot of deaths in the 20 stories selected by judges Michael Cunningham, Pam Houston, and George Saunders. Read full book review >
PRIZE STORIES 1998 by Larry Dark
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Definitely worth picking through, even for readers who aren't all that serious."
This latest installment of the venerable O. Henry winners, edited by old-hand critic Dark (Prize Stories 1997, etc.), provides some pleasures amid few surprises. Read full book review >
PRIZE STORIES 1997 by Larry Dark
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Introspection may be the prerequisite of serious literature, but it is not its end—and is obviously not its guarantee."
The fortunes of the short story are about as uncertain today as those of Bosnia, mainly because it's no longer clear whether this once-popular literary form has many readers who are not writers themselves. Read full book review >
THE LITERARY TRAVELER by Larry Dark
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"All the excitement of a trans-Atlantic flight."
These New Yorkerstyle short stories are filled with middle- class characters, most of whom—in defiance of travel-literature conventions—steadfastly refuse to experience an epiphany. Read full book review >