Books by Lila Prap

DOGGY WHYS? by Lila Prap
by Lila Prap, illustrated by Lila Prap
ANIMALS
Released: June 11, 2011

"Filled with questions any child might ask, replete with a sense of warmth and good cheer and packing enough offbeat facts to entice even the most reluctant reader, this is bound to be a classroom favorite as well as a great choice for any dog lover. Can a selection on cats be far behind? (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Everything you wondered about dogs but were afraid to ask is answered in this slim, friendly volume of canine Q&A. Read full book review >
DINOSAURS?! by Lila Prap
by Lila Prap, illustrated by Lila Prap
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2010

Loaded with appeal for confirmed young fans, this import surrounds thick-lined, grainy, colored cartoon portraits of 14 dinosaurs with an awed audience of modern dino-descendants—which is to say, chickens. Separated by artful placement on each spread, the commentary (which is delivered by an excited hen) comes on three levels: a short headline ("DINOSAURS LAID EGGS, JUST LIKE CHICKENS!"); a basic introduction to each dino's individual features and habits; and a block of additional detail or background information. The picture gallery closes with a charted family tree, and the ongoing tide of snarky side comments from the peanut gallery ("If this one looks anything like me, I'm going to get a new face!") culminates in a hatchling's proud proclamation, "From now on my name is Chickesaurus Rex!" From now on human visitors to the henhouse had better watch their step. (Informational picture book. 6-8)Read full book review >
DADDIES by Lila Prap
by Lila Prap, illustrated by Lila Prap
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

An imaginative son and his father romp through a myriad of incarnations of animal pairs in the five minutes before bedtime. Rhinos and giraffes, snails and chameleons, hyenas and parrots—the father/son pairs describe what they do together: "My daddy is an elephant, / he is so very strong. / But when he has to lift a tree, / he's glad that I'm along." Save for one awkward phrasing, the rhymes and rhythms are spot-on. Prap's bold textured colors and black borders are her trademark, and this latest does not disappoint. Colorful patterned borders hem in each father and son, while the animals fill all the rest of the available space. Youngsters will have no difficulty identifying the animals, though some may question why the male kangaroos have pouches. Regardless, this is a loving tribute to the special relationship between a father and his son. (Picture book. 3-6)Read full book review >
ANIMAL LULLABIES by Lila Prap
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

A creative look at what lullabies animals might sing to their babies. From farm and forest animals to reptiles and insects, the more beloved and well-known creatures are found here. Combining animal sounds with gentle rhythms and rhymes, some lullabies are sweet, some filled with imagery and others simply silly: "Chirp, chirp, / chirp, chirp. / Night has come, / the concert's begun. / All crickets in tune / to the light / of the moon. / Chirp, chirp, / chirp, chirp." A common denominator in the majority of songs, the moon is cleverly illustrated from the animals' perspectives. For the chicken, the moon and its surrounding cloud look like an egg over easy. To the mice, the moon is a piece of cheese and to the cats, it's a ball of string. Prap's trademark bold textured colors and black borders are evident, but the youngest readers may have trouble identifying some animals because of their overly simple outlines. A sweet bedtime poetry collection, but for lullabies, nothing beats Kate McMullan and David McPhail's If You Were My Bunny (1996). (Picture book. 3-6)Read full book review >
1001 STORIES by Lila Prap
by Lila Prap, illustrated by Lila Prap
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2006

This ingenious amalgamation of fairy tales will have readers opening it over and over, never reading the same tale twice. As with Choose Your Own Adventure, each page offers a short snippet of story, then two choices in the form of questions. These allow youngsters to shape the plot and turn the fairy-tale world upside down. What if the Big Bad Wolf got sick on the way to Grandma's? Or mixing things up: What if beautiful Little Red ran from the wolf and got trapped in a castle by a beast? Children will quickly memorize the page numbers of story beginnings so they can skip straight to a new tale. Those familiar with the older series may be disappointed to find that some of the choices offered will undo the fate that has just befallen the character. Prap's illustrations bring to mind scratchboard art, with black outlines and bold, textured colors. The characters are easily recognizable, and the back endpaper features a map. A great addition to any fairy-tale collection, teacher's bookshelf to teach parts of a story or carry-on tote. (Picture book. 3-8)Read full book review >