Filled with questions any child might ask, replete with a sense of warmth and good cheer and packing enough offbeat facts to...

READ REVIEW

DOGGY WHYS?

Everything you wondered about dogs but were afraid to ask is answered in this slim, friendly volume of canine Q&A.

Questions range from why dogs bark and wag their tails to why there are so many breeds to that perennial question of why they sniff each other’s bottoms. Each spread features a question on canine behavior or attributes, which is followed by whimsical and arch offerings from a chorus of cats (“Why do dogs do what we tell them? Because they don’t know how to use their own heads. Because they can’t open a can of dog food on their own. Because they want people to like them more than people like cats”). Factual, accessible text then provides straightforward answers and a focus on a breed that personifies said characteristic, complete with a textured illustration in rich earthy tones and a description of the breed and its assets as a pet. Endpapers show different breeds as well as imaginary mixed breeds to identify (answers are at the back of the book).

Filled with questions any child might ask, replete with a sense of warmth and good cheer and packing enough offbeat facts to entice even the most reluctant reader, this is bound to be a classroom favorite as well as a great choice for any dog lover. Can a selection on cats be far behind? (Informational picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: June 11, 2011

ISBN: 978-0-7358-4014-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: NorthSouth

Review Posted Online: April 18, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2011

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A bland also-ran trailing a large litter of like-themed pups.

WOLF PUPS JOIN THE PACK

From the First Discoveries series

A photo album of young wolves running, playing, and growing through their first year.

Light on factual details, the uncredited text largely runs to vague observations along the lines of the fact that “young wolves need to rest every now and then” or that packs “differ in size. Some are large and have many wolves, while others are small with only a few.” The chief draws here are the big, color, stock photos, which show pups of diverse ages and species, singly or in groups—running, posing alertly with parents or other adult wolves, eating (regurgitated food only, and that not visible), howling, patrolling, and snoozing as a seasonal round turns green meadows to snowy landscapes. In a notably perfunctory insertion squeezed onto the final spread, a wildlife biologist from the American Museum of Natural History introduces himself and describes his research work—all with animals other than wolves. Budding naturalists should have no trouble running down more nourishing fare, from Seymour Simon’s Wolves (1993) to Jonathan London’s Seasons of Little Wolf (illustrated by Jon Van Zyle, 2014) and on. Baby Dolphin’s First Swim follows the same formula even down to profiling exactly the same wildlife biologist.

A bland also-ran trailing a large litter of like-themed pups. (Informational picture book. 5-7)

Pub Date: June 6, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4549-2237-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Sterling

Review Posted Online: April 26, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2017

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A soaring read-aloud that makes the rare national bird of the Philippines accessible to young environmentalists.

AN EAGLE'S FEATHER

A pair of critically endangered Philippine eagles in captivity aspire to life in the wild despite growing developments surrounding them.

“Flying high above the forest of Tambala at sunrise, Kalayaan spots a monkey. Food! / The young Philippine eagle swoops down to follow the monkey. Where did it go?” In concise and evenly paced text, Kalayaan is pursuing his prey when “BOOM!”: He is shot by a hunter. Luckily he is rescued by a father and son before “everything turns dark.” Upon awakening he meets Pinpin, a female eagle bred in captivity. Pinpin informs him that he is in rehabilitation and is optimistic that both can be released in the wild. Alvarez, a Philippine-based artist, illuminates the eagles’ dreams of the forest with bleeding layers of pastel-hued watercolors embellished with highlighting patterns. While they wait for Kalayaan to recover, both birds discuss how “the forest has been cut down for timber, so that eagles have less and less space to hunt for food.” Ho successfully addresses the complex issues with clarity without detracting from the heart of the story. Both eagles eventually find a hope-filled conclusion. A portion of the proceeds benefits the Philippine Eagle Foundation.

A soaring read-aloud that makes the rare national bird of the Philippines accessible to young environmentalists. (author’s note, bibliography) (Picture book. 5-8)

Pub Date: April 5, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-943645-23-7

Page Count: 36

Publisher: Cornell Lab Publishing Group

Review Posted Online: March 4, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more