Books by Liza Woodruff

A QUIETER STORY by Liza Woodruff
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 9, 2019

"Lively and amusing, this story about making stories will likely find eager listeners—and may just inspire some writing projects, too. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A child writes a story about a pet—with some help. Read full book review >
EMERSON BARKS by Liza Woodruff
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"While Emerson is an appealing character, Jules Feiffer's Bark, George (1999) remains the clear choice in accounts of caterwauling canines. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A tiny, gray dog with a loud, annoying bark tries to stop bothering his neighbors. Read full book review >
SUPER SILLY SCHOOL POEMS by David Greenberg
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 24, 2014

"Stick with Prelutsky and Silverstein. (Picture book/poetry. 6-8)"
A collection of poems to start the school year off with a laugh. Read full book review >
IF IT'S SNOWY AND YOU KNOW IT, CLAP YOUR PAWS! by Kim Norman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"Consistently entertaining and engaging. All together now! (Picture book. 3-6)"
A wintry riff on the popular participation song, with a cast of appropriate cold-climate animals. Read full book review >
TICK BAIT'S UNIVERSE by Marc Gamble
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 8, 2012

"This well-designed odyssey truly does put the universe at viewers' fingertips. (iPad informational app. 6-12)"
A "powers of 10" app that takes young explorers from quarks to the furthest reaches of the observable universe. Read full book review >
HOW ABOUT A KISS FOR ME? by Todd Tarpley
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2010

Readers join a little boy as he puckers up for some pretty unusual kisses. Dogs, frogs, cats, bats and all manner of farmyard animals are all recipients of this curious toddler's smooches. "Do you like to kiss a bunny? / Kiss a bunny? That is funny." From these rather harmless animals, he then goes on to consider toes, cacti, worms, mops and skunks. But at the end of the day, the most enthusiastic recipient of his kisses is his dad, who hugs and kisses him before tucking him in: "There's nothing I would rather do / Than be someone who's kissed by you." Tarpley's rolling verse reads aloud easily, and the text/illustration juxtapositions lend well to predictive reading. The absurdity of some of the kissing combinations will appeal to little ones. Woodruff's sweet watercolors depict an overall-clad toddler with muddy cheeks and an adorable smile. Pucker up—this one's sure to elicit kisses with every reading. (Picture book. 1-3)Read full book review >
THE BIG SCOOP by Dorian Cirrone
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

Lindy Blues, a pint-sized investigative reporter with her own news show, wants to follow in the footsteps of her idol, Katie Couric. Although her cameraman is her little brother and her LBN—Lindy Blues Network—airs only in her garage on Saturday nights, Lindy tackles the latest breaking news with the panache and determination that rivals seasoned correspondents twice her age. Cirrone offers readers a spunky, likable heroine who thinks on her feet and truly embodies an entrepreneurial spirit. Lindy's investigation of a disappearing ice cream shop is just tricky enough to solve, keeping readers tuned in until the satisfying dénouement. Woodruff uses soft-pencil sketches to highlight the ups and downs of Lindy's broadcasting adventures, bringing life to the characters. Cirrone's mix of an intriguing mystery and a feisty, capable heroine will hold widespread appeal for readers. (Fiction. 7-10)Read full book review >
THE MISSING SILVER DOLLAR by Dorian Cirrone
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2006

This early chapter book follows multitasking fourth grader Lindy Blues as she tracks down stories for her weekly neighborhood news show. Assisted by her brother Alex and his hand-me-down camcorder, Lindy broadcasts from the "Lindy Blues Network Studio"—her garage. Curious and clever, she turns a slow news day into a buoyant first-person account, using math skills both to solve the titular mystery and help her friend Joshua win a toy rocket launch contest. Information about U.S. silver dollars is woven into the text, and Woodruff's lively illustrations complement and extend the story. The use of the present tense, and Lindy's tendency to refer to herself in the third person, seem stylistically right, given the busy girl's dedication to her reportorial role. Tuned-in kids will enjoy Lindy's inventiveness as she scoops some really local news. (Fiction. 7-9)Read full book review >
AMANDA BEAN'S AMAZING DREAM by Cindy Neuschwander
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

The protagonist in this story has a sort of low-grade obsessive/compulsive disorder: "I count anything and everything," chirps Amanda. The problem is that Amanda's class is moving on to multiplication and she just doesn't get it. So she keeps counting things one by one until a dream of too many sheep, too many knitting needles, and too many sweaters pushes her over the edge. Amanda's story is the forgettable vehicle for what is really at stake here: to disclose the mysteries of multiplication. While the illustrations make the concept graphically obvious, the text can be confusing: "I know about the multiplication sign, X. It means that things can come in groups, or rows, or columns," but "What I do not know are the multiplication facts." The term multiplication table is avoided, to no positive effect. At the end of the book, Marilyn Burns (The Greedy Triangle, 1995, etc.) does a credible, if prim, job of explaining the broad contexts of multiplication to adults working with children. (Picture book. 6-10) Read full book review >