Books by Maria Flook

LUX by Maria Flook
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 13, 2004

"Flook's descriptions can be breathtaking, but the ludicrous plot, maddeningly irrelevant exposition, and unlikable characters leave this one flat."
After Invisible Eden (2003), a true-crime bestseller, Flook returns with a third novel (following Open Water, 1995, etc.): a tale of romance between two year-rounders on Cape Cod. Read full book review >
INVISIBLE EDEN by Maria Flook
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: July 1, 2003

"A thoughtful, measured tone gives this tale of murder a sense of depth and reach, like a good poem."
Chilling, edgy backgrounder on the high-profile 2002 murder of a fashion journalist. Read full book review >
MY SISTER LIFE by Maria Flook
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 14, 1998

"Flook's book should sing with pain, but it's strangely flat, if skillfully written—the reflections of her reflections, minus the power of myth."
 A retelling of the lives of two sisters, separated as young teenagers when each was caught in an undertow of drugs, prostitution, and mental institutions. Read full book review >
YOU HAVE THE WRONG MAN by Maria Flook
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 11, 1996

"Deeply flawed—and almost as deeply interesting—work from an ambitious writer who's obviously still finding her material and her voice, and who may yet produce much better fiction."
 A frustratingly uneven first collection, by the young author of the novels Family Night (1992) and Open Water (1995). Read full book review >
OPEN WATER by Maria Flook
Released: Jan. 25, 1995

"Some startling scenes and enchanting writing, but Flook's depiction of feeble psyches and unending despair ultimately anesthetizes the reader."
 As in Flook's first novel (Family Night, 1993), a dark, strong start lapses into weary complacency as the characters' weaknesses prove insurmountable and addictions to drugs, sex, and loss become their guiding lights. Read full book review >
FAMILY NIGHT by Maria Flook
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Some chilling moments and marvelous writing, but these characters rarely earn either sympathy or a belief in the degree of disturbance they show."
 Poet Flook's first novel gets off to a taut, edgy start, but the self-indulgent characters grow tiresome well before the conclusion. Read full book review >