Books by Mary Reed

AN EMPIRE FOR RAVENS  by Mary Reed
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 2, 2018

"The 12th franchise entry (Murder in Megara, 2015, etc.) places the reader in the middle of the turmoil of sixth-century Rome and into a tense historical mystery."
An exiled Lord Chamberlain unravels layers of deception when he returns to the site of his banishment to rescue a friend. Read full book review >
MURDER IN MEGARA by Mary Reed
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"John's 11th case combines historical detail with a cerebral mystery full of surprises."
Long used to solving mysteries for an emperor, a newly powerless man must solve one for himself. Read full book review >
NINE FOR THE DEVIL by Mary Reed
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 2012

"Whores, beggars, lawyers, even a tax collector and a pope wander around Constantinople's back alleys, brothels, kitchens and church sanctum sanctorums. What a relief for John (Eight for Eternity, 2010, etc.) to be finally freed of his duties and prepare to take his household off to Greece."
How can you find a killer who doesn't exist? Read full book review >
SEVEN FOR A SECRET by Mary Reed
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 2008

"Meanders from brothels to copper markets to public baths and poetry readings, each rife with all the gossip, rumor, deceit and lewdness you'd expect from one of the Lord Chamberlain's cases (Six for Gold, 2005, etc.)."
Constantinople intrigue during the reign of Justinian and Theodora. Read full book review >
SIX FOR GOLD by Mary Reed
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"A busy historical mystery with an engagingly wry tone. Many detours, but getting there is most of the fun."
Who killed the Roman Senator, and why are the Egyptian sheep slitting their own throats? Read full book review >
TWO FOR JOY by Mary Reed
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2000

"Plotting as byzantine as you'd expect, along with gore, whores, and an eight-page glossary. "
Justinian I, emperor of Constantinople from a.d. 527-565, is not nearly as bothered by the seemingly spontaneous combustion of three stylites—holy men who sit atop pillars as they pray and preach—as he is by the missives from another holy man, Michael, who wants to share his power and insists on a meeting. Justinian sends his Lord Chamberlain, John the Eunuch (One for Sorrow, not reviewed), along with Aurelius, a well-to-do senator (is there any other kind?), to confront Michael, and the two set off, leaving behind Aurelius' son, court dandy Anatolius, who is planning a fancy dinner party for his dad, and Philo the philosopher, John's former teacher at the Academy, who has been his impoverished houseguest since the closing of the school. As Michael, surrounded by worshipping pilgrims, is demanding that Justinian deal with him personally, Aurelius is poisoned at the dinner festivities back home, and a dancing girl, one of Isis the madam's prostitutes, spontaneously combusts. And when Justinian sequesters himself to think, his licentious wife (and brothel alumna) Theodora takes control and arrests Anatolius, plots against John, and lets Constantinople seethe under the warring Christians, Mirthraists, and pagans. Meanwhile, Philo is murdered, the inland sea explodes into flames, and John and his manservant Peter, after pretending to go into exile, sneak back to solve the burnings, decipher a code left by Philo, discredit Michael by revealing the meaning of an ankle tattoo, and arrange Anatolius' freedom.Read full book review >