Books by Michael Stein

THE RAPE OF THE MUSE by Michael Stein
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"The novel is certainly a worthy read for anyone interested in the art scene, but readers seeking an outcome to care about may want to keep looking."
Stein's deftly written literary novel examines the art world through the eyes of a young artist, Rand Taber. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 2009

"A heartfelt attempt to explain an often misunderstood disease."
Compassionate but sometimes tedious look at the grim realities of addiction and recovery. Read full book review >
IN THE AGE OF LOVE by Michael Stein
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2007

"For all his careful construction, Stein's novel never quite takes off."
Stein (This Room Is Yours, 2004, etc.) examines the chance reunion of two former lovers in his brief fifth novel. Read full book review >
THIS ROOM IS YOURS by Michael Stein
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"Moving without a hint of sentimentality: an extremely sad and emotionally realistic tale of normal, troubled life as it is lived in the face of sickness and death."
A glum and rather austere novel from Stein (The Lynching Tree, 2000, etc.) describes a young man's reactions to his mother's struggle with Alzheimer's. Read full book review >
THE LYNCHING TREE by Michael Stein
Released: Dec. 1, 2000

"Stein shuffles fragments of his climax throughout the novel, a device not all to the good, since it suggests a stronger close than the story can actually bear. Still, well done, even memorable, if not altogether fulfilling."
Short novel about the first black cop in Pompan, New Jersey, and what happens when the world slips out from underfoot. Read full book review >
PROBABILITIES by Michael Stein
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"From Stein, though, the result is an absolute charmer with a spry and sarcastic edge."
First-time novelist Stein tells the surprisingly appealing story of a teenager living through the complexity of a premature adulthood. Read full book review >