Books by Michele Wood

LIKE A BIRD by Cynthia Grady
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"An important work that gives new life to old and important songs. (Informational picture book. 5-10)"
When children see Harriet Tubman on the new U.S. postage stamp, they can learn of her legacy from this literary homage to "the Moses of her people." Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"A tremendous opportunity for children to understand what these women worked so hard to accomplish—one succeeding and one coming close. (capsule biographies, additional notes, bibliography, author's note) (Picture book. 8-12)"
Two iconic women recount their stories. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 15, 2012

"A powerful grouping of thought-provoking poems and brilliantly designed paintings. (author's note, illustrator's note, bibliography) (Poetry. 10 & up)"
Enslaved African-Americans voice the weariness, drudgery, agony and dreams of their lives in a beautiful and informative collection of poetry and paintings. Read full book review >
I SEE THE RHYTHM OF GOSPEL by Toyomi Igus
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

"An accompanying CD contains five songs representing selected musical eras, with the Golden Gate Quartet and—spectacularly—Mahalia Jackson, the clear standouts. (foreword, quotations, suggested song list) (Informational picture book/poetry. 8-12)"
Reprising the vibrancy of their Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award winner, I See the Rhythm (1998), Wood and Igus celebrate African-American gospel music along its historical transit from the Middle Passage to 21st-century "Holy Hip Hop." Read full book review >
I SEE THE RHYTHM by Toyomi Igus
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: April 1, 1998

"Stylish and lively design pulls it all together into an absorbing, attractive package. (Picture book. 7-9)"
The collaborators on Going Back Home (1997) return with a stunning history of African-American music. Read full book review >
GOING BACK HOME by Toyomi Igus
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"The text interprets the images in light of the stories; the result is a visually vibrant, factual book that's sure to appeal to children of diverse ethnicities. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-10)"
Igus (Two Mrs. Gibsons, p. 448) creates a warm first-person narration for Wood's art, reading as much like an exhibition program with interpretive notes as it does a history of the artist's family in the South. Read full book review >