Books by Mo Yan

LIFE AND DEATH ARE WEARING ME OUT by Mo Yan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 2008

"The recent Nobel awarded to Gao Xingjian may have ousted Mo Yan from the top level of contenders. If so, the selection committee may have to be 're-educated.' He's one hell of a writer."
Epic black comedy from the inventive Chinese author (Big Breasts and Wide Hips, 2004, etc.) frequently mentioned as a leading Nobel Prize contender. Read full book review >
BIG BREASTS AND WIDE HIPS by Mo Yan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"Ambitious, if at times prolix."
In a sprawling saga that spans a century, the noted Chinese author chronicles the lives of the Shangguan family, graphically illustrating his country's violent past and corrupt present. Read full book review >
SHIFU, YOU’LL DO ANYTHING FOR A LAUGH by Mo Yan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Uneven work. But when Mo Yan's imagination cuts loose, and the gloves come off, he can be a provocative and powerfully original writer."
A mixed-bag collection of frequently abrasive, imaginative stories written in the 1980s and '90s by the highly visible Chinese author (Red Sorghum, 1993; The Republic of Wine, 2000). Read full book review >
THE REPUBLIC OF WINE by Mo Yan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 2000

"Mo Yan has heretofore looked like China's Maxim Gorky; it now seems he may also be his country's Evelyn Waugh or Groucho Marx."
You may think you're watching Twin Peaks on Chinese television halfway through this rumbustious melodramatic satire by the internationally acclaimed author (1993's Red Sorghum, the source of a prize-winning film; The Garlic Ballads, 1995). Read full book review >
THE GARLIC BALLADS by Mo Yan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1995

"An affecting vindication of the human spirit under extreme duress—from a writer of tremendous power and sympathy."
An epic tale, banned in China, that tells of ordinary lives brutally destroyed by greed—official and familial. Read full book review >
RED SORGHUM by Mo Yan
Released: April 1, 1993

"A notable new arrival."
A powerful new voice on the brutal unrest of rural China in the late 20's and 30's. Read full book review >