Books by Howard Goldblatt

THE BOAT TO REDEMPTION by Su Tong
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

In a loosely paced, prize-winning political satire, possible descendants of a Chinese revolutionary martyr are linked to an orphan girl with a bourgeois attitude.

Su Tong (My Life as Emperor, 2005, etc.) won the Asian Man Literary Prize for this salty tragicomedy tracing an absurdly burdened life in the era of the Cultural Revolution. Read full book review >

THREE SISTERS by Bi Feiyu
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 9, 2010

"The story and its details might resonate for a Chinese audience—or, for that matter, Western readers well-versed in contemporary history—but it is unlikely to captivate most English-language readers."
A second novel in English from the Chinese screenwriter and author (The Moon Opera, 2009). Read full book review >
THE MOON OPERA by Bi Feiyu
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 29, 2009

"Flawed, but elegantly theatrical and emotionally resonant—just like a good opera."
The American debut of an acclaimed Chinese novelist. Read full book review >
LIFE AND DEATH ARE WEARING ME OUT by Mo Yan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 1, 2008

"The recent Nobel awarded to Gao Xingjian may have ousted Mo Yan from the top level of contenders. If so, the selection committee may have to be "re-educated." He's one hell of a writer."
Epic black comedy from the inventive Chinese author (Big Breasts and Wide Hips, 2004, etc.) frequently mentioned as a leading Nobel Prize contender. Read full book review >
WOLF TOTEM by Jiang Rong
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 31, 2008

"Any admirer of Jack London—or of Dersu, or Farley Mowat, or other chronicles and chroniclers of wolf-human interaction—will find this a treasure."
The Call of the Wild meets Dersu Uzala in the wilds of Inner Mongolia in this sweeping debut novel by retired Chinese academician Jiang. In China, it has emerged as a zeitgeist novel, outselling any other in Chinese history short of Mao's little red book. Read full book review >
LOUD SPARROWS by Aili Mu
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2006

"A curiosity at best."
Anthology of Chinese short-shorts ranges from exotic to downright weird. Read full book review >
MY LIFE AS EMPEROR by Su Tong
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 2005

"Not Su Tong's best, but he's always well worth reading."
The rise and fall of a callow adolescent monarch, in a strange, strained tale from the gifted Chinese author (Raise the Red Lantern, 1993; Rice, 1995). Read full book review >
BIG BREASTS AND WIDE HIPS by Mo Yan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"Ambitious, if at times prolix."
In a sprawling saga that spans a century, the noted Chinese author chronicles the lives of the Shangguan family, graphically illustrating his country's violent past and corrupt present. Read full book review >
RED POPPIES by Alai
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 6, 2002

"A compelling portrait of an unfamiliar place on the cusp of modernity: a promising new writer."
Debut fiction describing the bloodstained last days of Tibetan chieftains before the Chinese communists took over their lands in 1949. Read full book review >
SHIFU, YOU’LL DO ANYTHING FOR A LAUGH by Mo Yan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Uneven work. But when Mo Yan's imagination cuts loose, and the gloves come off, he can be a provocative and powerfully original writer."
A mixed-bag collection of frequently abrasive, imaginative stories written in the 1980s and '90s by the highly visible Chinese author (Red Sorghum, 1993; The Republic of Wine, 2000). Read full book review >
GREEN RIVER DAYDREAMS by Liu Heng
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

A richly detailed realistic saga from the Chinese author best known for his novel Black Snow (1993) and for stories reshaped into the critically praised films Ju Dou and Red Sorghum. Read full book review >

PLEASE DON’T CALL ME HUMAN by Wang Shuo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2000

The maverick Chinese author of Playing for Thrills (1997) has made even more enemies in his homeland with this abrasive and furiously imaginative satire on China's haughty traditionalism, reverence for elders, and obsession with "saving face," among other national traits. Read full book review >

THE REPUBLIC OF WINE by Mo Yan
THRILLERS
Released: April 1, 2000

"Mo Yan has heretofore looked like China's Maxim Gorky; it now seems he may also be his country's Evelyn Waugh or Groucho Marx."
You may think you're watching Twin Peaks on Chinese television halfway through this rumbustious melodramatic satire by the internationally acclaimed author (1993's Red Sorghum, the source of a prize-winning film; The Garlic Ballads, 1995). Read full book review >
Released: July 1, 1995

The title is the second-best thing about this extremely uneven anthology of 20 stories written between 1985 and 1993. The best is ``The Brothers Shu,'' by Su Tong (the acclaimed Raise the Red Lantern, 1993), a preternaturally vivid vision of family unhappiness and hatred that blend together sexual torment, homicidal sibling rivalry, shape-shifting, and an aborted love suicide into a fiercely comic Dostoyevskian stew that fairly spews vitriol off the page. Read full book review >