Books by Nicholas Griffin

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"Griffin bites off a huge story but manages to maintain lively interest in the array of personalities involved."
A quirky, thoroughly enjoyable trek through the implausible beginnings of international table tennis and the colorful characters-cum-diplomats behind it. Read full book review >
DIZZY CITY by Nicholas Griffin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 21, 2007

"Smart entertainment."
In the latest from Griffin (Caucasus: A Journey to the Land Between Christianity and Islam, 2004, etc.), a petty criminal flees the carnage of the Great War and lands among con men in the Big Apple, where war of a different sort is being waged. Read full book review >
CAUCASUS by Nicholas Griffin
NON-FICTION
Released: March 21, 2003

"Lively, thoughtful, and a big help in elucidating bewildering struggles in faraway mountains."
A satisfying blend of history and travel memoir, set in the tortured, contested landscapes of the Caucasus Mountains. Read full book review >
THE HOUSE OF SIGHT AND SHADOW by Nicholas Griffin
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 27, 2001

"Griffin's House is drenched in foggy, gaslit, garbage-strewn detail (not to mention several heavy echoes of A Tale of Two Cities), but it fails to live up to the viscerally dramatic promise of its yeasty opening chapters. Disappointing."
Images of Hogarth's Gin Lane and Fielding's Inns of Court arise from this densely atmospheric historical tale, the second from the young English-born author of The Requiem Shark (2000). Read full book review >
THE REQUIEM SHARK by Nicholas Griffin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2000

"A splendid debut."
Exciting, and occasionally gruesome, debut swashbuckler that replaces Hollywood conventions of swordplay and melodramatic revenge with brutally frank historical realism. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 15, 1992

"A brilliant psychological portrait, annotated and explained with tact and sensitivity."
An "epistolary biography'' comprised of a selection of Russell's previously unpublished correspondence—mostly love letters to his wife, Alys, and to Ottoline Morrell, a married Bloomsbury courtesan—discussing his work, education, women's rights and his own priggish morality. Read full book review >