Books by Olaf Olafsson

RESTORATION by Olaf Olafsson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 7, 2012

"Though there are some quasi-literary flourishes here, the interior lives of the characters rarely rise above melodramatic cliché."
A soap-opera romance set against a dramatic backdrop of war, art and the hills of Tuscany, from Olafsson (Valentines, 2007, etc.), a top executive at Time Warner. Read full book review >
VALENTINES by Olaf Olafsson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"The title of this collection is ironic; any love that flows here is wayward and all too perishable."
The Icelandic-American novelist (Walking into the Night, 2003, etc.) titles the 12 stories in this collection after months of the year. Read full book review >
WALKING INTO THE NIGHT by Olaf Olafsson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 28, 2003

"Clear-eyed and captivating, Olafsson writes effortlessly, seemingly incapable of a dull paragraph or page. His people are real, period atmosphere and detail unobtrusively perfect, his novel a gem and small masterpiece."
Icelandic-born Olafsson (The Journey Home, 2000; Absolution, 1994) tells the life story of William Randolph Hearst's fictional butler—deftly and grippingly. Read full book review >
THE JOURNEY HOME by Olaf Olafsson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 21, 2000

"A striking character study, marred by a surfeit of rapid time shifts that keep us guessing 'which' Disa appears on any given page, even as we grow increasingly absorbed in her several stories."
Native Icelandic author (and now an American executive at Time-Warner) Olafsson's evocative second novel (following Absolution, 1994) records both a literal homeward return and a journey into the mind, heart, and memories of Asdis ("Disa") Read full book review >
ABSOLUTION by Olaf Olafsson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 14, 1994

"Beautifully crafted, and, even though both the pace and the conceit pall a little, a welcome new voice."
The English-language debut of an Icelandic writer now living in New York: a novel that perceptively probes the depths of two ÇmigrÇ Icelanders' self-deceptions. Read full book review >