Books by Paul Auster

Paul Auster was born in Newark, New Jersey, in 1947 to middle class parents. After attending Columbia University he lived in France for four years. Since returning to America in 1974, he has published poems, essays, novels and translations.


REPORT FROM THE INTERIOR by Paul Auster
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 19, 2013

"Auster has long rendered life as something of a puzzle; here are some significant, illuminating pieces."
The interplay of memory, identity and the creative imagination informs this portrait of the artist as a young man, a memoir that the novelist's avid readership will find particularly compelling. Read full book review >
HERE AND NOW by Paul Auster
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 11, 2013

"Amiable and revealing missives from two remarkable minds."
A genial, often riveting exchange of letters between American novelist Auster (Winter Journal, 2010, etc.) and the South African (now an Australian citizen) Nobel laureate Coetzee (Scenes from Provincial Life, 2012, etc.). Read full book review >
WINTER JOURNAL by Paul Auster
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 21, 2012

"A consummate professional explores the attic of his life, converting rumination to art."
The acclaimed novelist (Sunset Park, 2010, etc.), now 65, writes affectingly about his body, family, lovers, travels and residences as he enters what he calls the winter of his life. Read full book review >
SUNSET PARK by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"Sure to please Auster fans and likely to attract new readers as well."
With a plot that encompasses war in the Middle East, economic recession and the perils of the publishing industry, a contemporary vitality distinguishes the latest from the veteran author. Read full book review >
INVISIBLE by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 27, 2009

"Auster writes of "the obsessive story that has wormed its way into your soul and become an integral part of your being." This is that story."
Many readers familiar with the work of Paul Auster consider him to be one of the most profound and provocative of contemporary novelists, a literary magician, a master of making fiction about the art—or the sleight-of-hand illusion—of making fiction. Read full book review >
TIMBUKTU by Paul Auster
by Paul Auster, illustrated by Julia Goschke, adapted by Julia Goschke
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

In a bold if not entirely successful move, Goschke adapts Auster's adult novel Timbuktu (1999) into a picture book/graphic novel for teens. Read full book review >

MAN IN THE DARK by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 18, 2008

"Probably Auster's best novel, and a plaintive summa of all the books that—we now see—have gone into its making."
The "parallel worlds" visited and occupied by an aging intellectual's troubled mind and heart assume intriguing metafictional form in Auster's challenging novel. Read full book review >
TRAVELS IN THE SCRIPTORIUM by Paul Auster
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"Though some will find that the illumination within the final three pages justifies the existential tedium preceding it, others will agree with Mr. Blank, who is "not the least bit amused" and wonders, "When is this nonsense going to end?""
Rarely has a novelist pulled the strings of his puppetry more transparently, as ardent fans may find this meta-fictional fable profound, while others may dismiss it as a literary parlor trick. Read full book review >
THE BROOKLYN FOLLIES by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 6, 2005

"An egregious misstep in an otherwise estimable career. "
A retired insurance salesman returns to his native Brooklyn to die—and is instead recalled to life—in Auster's uncharacteristically upbeat 12th novel (Oracle Night, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >
ORACLE NIGHT by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2003

"The urban intellectual thriller is Auster's game, but he played it to superior effect in The Book of Illusions (2002). Oracle Night, fascinating as it is, is a lesser performance."
A blocked novelist lives through a labyrinthine challenge to his artistic conviction that "[t]here was no connection between imagination and reality," in Auster's teasing, tricky 11th novel. Read full book review >
THE BOOK OF ILLUSIONS by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 4, 2002

"In many ways, a summa of Auster's entire oeuvre, and a gripping and immensely satisfying novel in its own right."
Auster's tenth novel is one of his finest: an elegant meditation on the question of whether an artist or his public "owns" the work he creates, and a thickly plotted succession of interlocking mysteries reminiscent of his highly praised New York Trilogy (The Locked Room, 1986, etc.). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 2001

"Bedside fodder for general readers and a bonanza for fiction writers looking for core stories to launch a novel."
A collection of vignettes from the American stew pot, written for broadcast on National Public Radio by men and women from every racial, cultural, and economic stratum. Read full book review >
TIMBUKTU by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1999

A slender doggy tale from Auster, who lately seems more concerned with providing product (and making movies) than matching the high standards of his earlier literary work (for example, Leviathan, 1992). Read full book review >

HAND TO MOUTH by Paul Auster
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Required, inspiring reading for Auster-holics and aspiring writers."
Artistic failure, financial woes, and broken love are the subjects of Auster's wide-ranging philosophical memoir, a candid assessment of the demands and rewards of art, work, and money. Read full book review >
MR. VERTIGO by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Disappointing."
Auster (Leviathan, 1992, etc.) departs from his usual cerebral fiction for this quick trip into Doctorow Land — a mytho-historical tale that invokes the American '20s, complete with glamorous gangsters and legendary sports stars. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 4, 1992

"Auster's "eccentric and peculiar tastes" cohere, in these critical pieces, into something much more than his modest claim that he's "simply one writer trying to talk about others."
Thirty Auster essays, reviews, prefaces, and interviews, nearly all of which have been previously published in small literary magazines or The New York Review of Books. Read full book review >
LEVIATHAN by Paul Auster
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"In a world thrown off-balance by uncertainty and chance, he pursues facts with the determination of a hard-nosed detective."
With each new work, Auster (Moon Palace, The Music of Chance, etc.) is quickly becoming our preeminent novelist of ideas—a postmodern fabulator who grounds his odd and challenging fictions in conventional and accessible narrative structures. Read full book review >
THE MUSIC OF CHANCE by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1990

"Despite some intrigue, a disappointing work."
Less ambitious and satisfying than Auster's last two novels (In The Country of Last Things, Moon Palace), this equally improbable tale seems a bit hastily conceived, with too many blurry edges and no compelling center to keep things in focus. Read full book review >
MOON PALACE by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1988

"Coming so soon after a string of masterly little novels, Auster's latest attests to the expansiveness of his vision and the deepening of his voice."
Like the best 18th-century fiction, this witty and wildly inventive novel revels in its implausibilities, and it does so with an attention to character and cosmos worthy of Swift, Fielding, or Sterne. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 20, 1987

The first two volumes of Auster's "New York Trilogy"—City of Glass (1985) and Ghosts (1986)—used mystery-fiction formulas as the basis for avant-garde explorations of identity crisis, death wish, and other existential traumas. Read full book review >
GHOSTS by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 20, 1986

"Walden to It's a Wonderful Life), this is a thin, derivative novella—devoid of genuine mystery-puzzle appeal (unlike City of Glass), thoroughly cliched in its mystery-as-metaphor pretensions."
Much less interesting than City of Glass (1985), this second exercise in avant-garde mystery metafiction follows a predictable, essentially familiar scenario: a detective, hired to shadow an enigmatic stranger, finds himself caught up in an existential, doppelganger-ish identity crisis. Read full book review >
IN THE COUNTRY OF LAST THINGS by Paul Auster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1986

"A stunning achievement."
Auster here turns from the metafictional playfulness of his recent detective yarns (City of Glass, 1985, and Ghosts, p. 822), and offers a spare and chilling account of a civilization in decay It's a post-apocalyptic vision of urban holocaust that bears witness to past, present, and future devastations. Read full book review >
CITY OF GLASS by Paul Auster
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Oct. 14, 1985

"Rather heady stuff for mystery fans, but a delight for students of experimental fiction."
In this fast-paced thriller, poet and essayist Auster transforms a conventional detective story into a post-modern theoretical diversion, without sacrificing intrigue or readability. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 1, 1982

"And, in all, this anthology is easily the most virtuous and important such venture since last year's Penguin omnibus of Hebrew poetry."
Given the historical interplay between French and English poetries, this up-do-date, dual-language anthology of French poetry since Apollinaire is a long-overdue treasure. Read full book review >
LIFE/SITUATIONS by Paul Auster
HISTORY
Released: April 15, 1977

This collection of four essays (1971-73) and three interviews (1971-75) by Sartre assumes additional, touching significance with his revelation that because of blindness his "occupation as a writer is completely destroyed." Read full book review >