Books by René Colato Laínez

¡VÁMONOS! / LET'S GO! by René Colato Laínez
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"Though the book is unquestionably well-meaning, it just doesn't work except as a vocabulary builder. (Bilingual picture book. 3-8)"
This bilingual spinoff of "The Wheels on the Bus" features many of the vehicles associated with community helpers. Read full book review >
SEÑOR PANCHO HAD A RANCHO by René Colato Laínez
Released: Sept. 15, 2013

"Chock-full of bicultural fun on the farm. (glossary, pronunciation guide, author's note) (Picture book. 3-7)"
Colato Laínez (The Tooth Fairy Meets El Ratón Pérez, 2010) presents a bicultural rendition of "Old MacDonald Had a Farm," one of the most widely known and loved children's songs. Read full book review >
FROM NORTH TO SOUTH/DEL NORTE AL SUR by René Colato Laínez
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"The child's perspective makes this a particularly moving glimpse of an increasingly common experience. (Picture book. 5-9)"
After his mother is deported by U.S. immigration officials, José and his father go to visit her at Centro Madres Assunta in Tijuana, where she will stay with other women and children until she gets her papers and can return. Read full book review >
Released: March 23, 2010

"And not only is Miguelito rewarded with two shiny coins under his pillow, but readers are treated to a clever introduction to two charming folk customs. (author's note, glossary of Spanish terms) (Picture book. 4-7)"
Mexican-American Miguelito loses his tooth and so begins an amusing battle between the Tooth Fairy and El Ratón Pérez. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 31, 2009

"The significance of this Hispanic tradition respecting both sides of a child's parentage is well explained in this easily understood example of cultural differences. (Picture book. 5-8)"
On the first day in his new school, René's teacher gives everyone a nametag with their first and last names. Read full book review >
Released: April 30, 2005

"A winner all-around. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Humorous illustrations, marked by oversized heads, mildly Cubist perspectives and rich pastels, combine with a wry narrative tone to fashion a marvelous look not simply at names shared by boys and girls, but also the transformation required of Spanish-speaking children as they remake themselves into English speakers. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 30, 2004

"Laínez's child-centered words make the concept of refugees more approachable and sympathetic, but Beto's love for his father goes beyond the specificity of the situation, making the story universally endearing. (Picture book. 4-7)"
For three years eight-year-old Beto and his mother, Salvadoran refugees, have been in the US, where his grandfather already lived. Read full book review >