Books by Robert Wuthnow

THE LEFT BEHIND by Robert Wuthnow
Released: March 1, 2018

"A superb, authoritative sociology book."
A leading sociologist examines the "moral outrage" of rural America. Read full book review >
ROUGH COUNTRY by Robert Wuthnow
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 24, 2014

"Impeccably researched but likely too dense for general readers."
A distinguished Princeton social sciences professor studies the fraught intersection of race, religion and ethnicity in Texas since Reconstruction. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Occasionally preachy (especially about why Reagan was the perfect symbol of the shallow spirituality of the '80s), but always subtly perceptive, this is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand noninstitutional religion in America."
A stirring, eloquent commentary on contemporary Americans— spiritual condition. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Though the book is rather plodding and offers vague philosophy instead of action, it does raise important questions about the internal life of the American worker."
A lengthy study of American workers and their relationship with money, though it lacks the spark of Wuthnow's foster father, Benjamin Franklin. Read full book review >
GOD AND MAMMON IN AMERICA by Robert Wuthnow
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 21, 1994

"There is, however, enough to attract the interested layperson as well."
An interesting but inconclusive look at the relationship between religion and money in contemporary America. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 3, 1994

Forty percent of all Americans meet regularly in support groups such as AA or Bible Study. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1993

"A very cloudy crystal ball."
Wuthnow (Social Sciences/Princeton), usually an elegant chronicler of social trends (Acts of Compassion, 1991, etc.), stumbles with this dull look at the future of the church. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Elegant, illuminating, and of significant interest in this decade of need and limits."
Why do Americans collectively devote 20 billion hours of their time each year to helping others? Read full book review >