Books by Ros Asquith

THE GREAT BIG BRAIN BOOK by Mary Hoffman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 3, 2020

"Bright and lively—but saddled with misses both near and wide. (glossary) (Informational picture book. 6-8)"
The creators of The Great Big Body Book (2016) pay tribute to the organ "in charge of every single thing our bodies can do." (Though look what's telling them that.) Read full book review >
PIRATE BABY by Mary Hoffman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2017

"A bonny but uneven bit o' tale telling. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Six buccaneers and a baby. Read full book review >
THE GREAT BIG BODY BOOK by Mary Hoffman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Cheerful and informative, this is a splendid introduction for humans of all shapes and sizes to share. (Informational picture book. 3-7)"
What is a body? Read full book review >
RAIDERS OF THE LOST SHARK by Lyn Gardner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2015

"For fans of the previous book, it's a lot more of the same. For newbies, consider walking the plank instead. (Adventure. 9-11)"
The baddies are back, and they're ready to do anything to locate their beloved treasure, even if it means having to fake acting school experience. Read full book review >
THE LOST TREASURE OF LITTLE SNORING by Lyn Gardner
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2015

"Flashes of wit notwithstanding, the gross is shoveled in with such vigor that even readers who revel in such stuff may weary. (Adventure. 9-11)"
An intrepid lad and his smart-girl best friend repel a pair of particularly putrid pirates in this unbridled farce. Read full book review >
THE GREAT BIG GREEN BOOK by Mary Hoffman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2015

"Far too hard a sell for the intended audience. (glossary, websites) (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Busy, colorful cartoons accompany text meant to encourage environmental activism in children. Read full book review >
WELCOME TO THE FAMILY by Mary Hoffman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2014

"Laudable in its inclusivity and content, imperfect in execution. (Informational picture book. 5-8)"
In a companion to The Great Big Book of Families (2011), Hoffman and Asquith tackle the myriad ways families are made in the 21st century.Read full book review >
MAX THE CHAMPION by Sean Stockdale
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 15, 2014

"This is not a subtle book, but its heart is absolutely in the right place. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A sports-obsessed boy makes his way through his day in winning style. Read full book review >
THE GREAT BIG BOOK OF FEELINGS by Mary Hoffman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2013

"Well-intentioned but only intermittently effective. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A smorgasbord of thoughts and pictures about a variety of feelings. Read full book review >
IT'S NOT FAIRY by Ros Asquith
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 16, 2013

"May not end complaining altogether, but it's sure to get a lot of laughs. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Rhymed and subversively, hilariously funny, this British import might well spark discussion while amusing mightily. Read full book review >
THE GREAT BIG BOOK OF FAMILIES by Mary Hoffman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2011

A primer on families in words and pictures. "Once upon a time," Hoffman begins, "most families in books looked like this." Asquith's illustration shows Caucasian daddy, mommy, son, daughter, dog and cat, all smiling and standing in a line. In the background is a neat little house with an apple tree, flowers and a white picket fence in front of it. "But in real life, families come in all sorts of shapes and sizes." Hoffman breaks it down with two-page spreads covering various topics: Who's in Your Family, Homes, School, Jobs, Holidays, Food ("Some moms and dads are great cooks...Others prefer to buy ready-made meals. Most families get their food from shops or markets. But some people grow their own") and more. Each spread is bordered by dozens of small illustrations; the spread on School, for example, features school books, varieties of writing utensils, paper and other items. The book ends with a challenge to try and make a family tree and a gallery of more than a dozen families, in framed pictures. "What's yours like today?" Hoffman asks. The text is packed with examples, and the same goes for Asquith's energetic watercolors. They celebrate diversity, not by proselytizing but by simply presenting it. For the very young, it will seem like a colorful reference book. A sublimely simple idea, brilliantly executed. (Picture book. 3-6)Read full book review >
BABY’S SHOE by Ros Asquith
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2006

A cumulative rhyming tale that will have listeners chiming in. Baby has lost his shoe, and it's up to his big brother to find it. He begins a careful search of the farmyard, trying every possible spot: "Is it in the cow field? Whoops! No! Moo!" He continues his search, looking in the duck pond, the sheep pen, the stable and even the pig's trough. Instead of the missing shoe, he manages to find mishaps around every corner, landing in the pond, falling into a mud puddle and sprawling in the hay. The search party grows as the animals from each location join in the hunt. Finally, giving up, the brother finds that the shoe has been hidden inside the baby's carriage all along. Animal sounds and simple rhymes insist on an interactive tale. Repetitive verses and Childs's bright, cheerfully colorful illustrations keep the silly story moving. Great fun for story time. (Picture book. 2-4)Read full book review >
MRS. PIG’S NIGHT OUT by Ros Asquith
ANIMALS
Released: June 15, 2003

Mr. Pig watches over his three children as Mrs. Pig gets a night out. Television, a pillow fight, and coloring soon replace a tearful goodbye as Big Piggy, Middle Piggy, and Little Piggy quickly discern that their father is a bit of a pushover. The fun continues as Mr. Pig dozes in his chair, unaware of the time. Hearing Mrs. Pig's return, he hastily sends the children to bed. Mr. Pig might think that he's fooled his wife, but her keen eye observes the mess throughout the house (including pictures of Mr. Pig sound asleep) and the fact that her children have gone to bed with their clothes on. Mrs. Pig kindly compliments her husband on a job well done, possibly thinking of a future outing for herself. Bright and lively illustrations, full of wiggly detail, show off this funny pig family as they go through the common parental ritual of the changing of the guard. (Picture book. 4-7)Read full book review >
BABIES by Ros Asquith
by Ros Asquith, illustrated by Sam Williams
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

A catalogue list of all the different types of babies begins as their diapered forms start tumbling across the pages. "There are big babies / and little babies, / do-lots and / do-little babies, / happy babies, / cross babies, / and ‘I'll show / you who's boss' babies." While there are many unique personalities featured here, one characteristic seems common to all babies: their propensity to giggle when tickled. A prompt, invites the reader to test this theory. "Let's try it: ‘Tickly wickly wee!' " Soft, subtly shaded watercolors perfectly render the many babies and toys in this latest poetic celebration. A final verse invites readers to celebrate the baby to whom they are reading. "The baby that I love the best, with all my heart, is . . . YOU!" As readers turn the page, a mirror peeks out from the inside of the back cover, inviting babies to take a look at that best-loved one. A perfect choice for an anytime snuggle. (Picture book. 1-4)Read full book review >
MY DO IT! by Ros Asquith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

Asquith's exuberant story celebrates the fierce independence of toddlerhood. The refrain "My do it!" is frequently heard as a tousle-headed tot barrels through his day. Asquith covers familiar territory for toddlers, depicting a young boy as he endeavors to dress himself, help Mommy do the grocery shopping, prepare lunch, and so on, until he eventually settles down for the night. Yet, in the end, the toddler's quest for autonomy gives way to a stronger desire—the need for a warm snuggle and a bedtime story that mother and child can do together. The lively text skips along at a merry pace. "Later the boy sat down to play / He found some crayons and some clay / and a funny puzzle of a cow. / ‘Come on,' said Mommy, / ‘I'll show you how.' / ‘My do it!' / And he did." The interactive story involves readers in the tale's progression, prompting them to help the boy complete his tasks by lifting the flaps to discover missing items, such as a lost puzzle piece or an elusive tub toy. Williams's vibrant illustrations are the focal point of every page, with the generously colored, large-sized drawings incorporating a plethora of toddler-pleasing minutiae; from the smiley faces on the boy's drinking mugs to the intriguing array of toys scattered across the bedroom floor. The cheerfully drawn visages of mother and child are sure to evoke some answering grins from readers. With thick pages and manageable flaps, this merry little book should keep busy tots happily occupied. (Picture book. 1-4)Read full book review >