Books by Rosie Reeve

TRAINING TALLULAH by Rosie Reeve
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 21, 2014

"This may satisfy absurdist kitty fans but leave others scratching their heads. (Picture book. 3-7)"
If a human can be very good at understanding Cat, how about the other way round? Read full book review >
MY FRIEND FRED by Hiawyn Oram
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"It's a doggone shame that didacticism mars the depiction of a young owner's relationship with her beloved pup. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A young girl shares a special bond with Fred, her family's pooch. Read full book review >
BELLA GETS HER SKATES ON by Ian Whybrow
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

Despite the regrettably trendy-sounding title, Whybrow's latest release is a sweetly wholesome tale. Given the moniker "Little Baby Not-Sure" by her father, the young rabbit Bella struggles with her propensity to worry. Overshadowed by her exuberant siblings, Bella takes a cautious approach to new experiences. When her father suggests an ice-skating outing, Bella is consumed by anxiety. Whybrow exhibits a keen understanding of a little one's misgivings, as Bella nervously wonders what could go wrong. Bella's father wisely suggests a series of confidence-building, play-centered activities to allay Bella's concerns. Reeve's illustrations, rendered in a medley of muted hues and softly blurred lines, further convey the winsome tenderness of the tale. Whybrow's adept and compassionate approach to resolving Bella's situation is bound to encourage fellow kindred spirits. Reluctant readers will take heart in Bella's ultimate triumph. (Picture book. 3-8)Read full book review >
DELILAH D. AT THE LIBRARY by Jeanne Willis
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 19, 2007

Delilah D., a precocious preschooler, insists that she's the queen of a distant country. Despite her mother's denials, Delilah firmly asserts that where she comes from, things are different. Just how different is detailed during Delilah's trip to the library with her younger brother and her babysitter. A land where libraries feature free doughnuts doesn't sound half bad, but Delilah's disruptive behavior will undoubtedly bring adult readers back to earth with a thud. From climbing up the bookshelves to singing very loudly, Delilah draws attention, but the patient "Library Anne" continues to cope. The babysitter, by the way, is exceedingly true to life—she spends her time at the library emailing her boyfriend. Sprawling colored pencil, ink and collage illustrations keep the focus squarely on Delilah, whether she's parading through her spacious home, sharing a made-up map of her country in a fold-out page or cavorting in the bright, cheerful library. While her antics may be amusingly familiar for parents and librarians, it's less clear how much kids will enjoy the arch humor. (Picture book. 5-8)Read full book review >