Books by Sarah Aronson

JUST LIKE RUBE GOLDBERG by Sarah Aronson
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 12, 2019

"An engaging volume that will encourage readers to think outside the lines. (author's note, sources) (Picture book/biography. 6-10)"
Rube Goldberg was a famous inventor who didn't invent anything. Read full book review >
KEEP CALM AND SPARKLE ON!  by Sarah Aronson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 26, 2017

"The friendship fixes may be simplistic, but this book has an endearing lead. (Fantasy. 6-9)"
Isabelle grapples with guilt and friendship as she works through Fairy Godmother Training, Level Two. Read full book review >
WORST FAIRY GODMOTHER EVER! by Sarah Aronson
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 30, 2017

"Underneath the sparkle there's a solid story. (Fantasy. 6-9)"
Isabelle's starting the first level of Fairy Godmother Training, and things don't look good. Read full book review >
BELIEVE by Sarah Aronson
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"Sluggish narration and characters' baffling emotional fluctuations will leave readers unfulfilled in spite of the novel's interesting premise. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Janine reacts to the increased media scrutiny surrounding her on the 10th anniversary of the suicide bombing that killed her parents with a series of peculiar behaviors, including a brief stint as a faith healer. Read full book review >
BEYOND LUCKY by Sarah Aronson
ADVENTURE
Released: June 30, 2011

"Solid. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A tense, superstitious, hardworking boy learns that luck is generated from the inside out. Read full book review >
HEAD CASE by Sarah Aronson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"I'm a head," declares 17-year-old Frank Marder, now a quadriplegic after downing five beers and getting behind the wheel. His reckless actions also killed two people, including his girlfriend. A judge thinks justice has been served, but on a public website, the community voices its outrage that Frank "walked away" free—except for one anonymous poster. Frank feels "frozen in time and space" until he's asked to speak at local high schools about preventing spinal-cord injuries. "There are no fairy-tale endings, Frank," his occupational therapist reminds him, yet as the teen faces the world again, his own culpability and the true identity of Anonymous, he finds hope and joy in the long, difficult road ahead of him. Although not as compelling as Terry Trueman's Stuck in Neutral (2000), Aronson's raw first novel delves into the emotions, mobility, daily functions (e.g., eating, talking on a phone and using a computer) and even the pleasures and sex of quadriplegics. Above all, it asks us to consider how we value individuals with disabilities. (Fiction. YA)Read full book review >