Books by Sarah Bird

Sarah Bird is the author of four previous novels: Virgin of the Rodeo, The Boyfriend School, Alamo House, and The Mommy Club. She lives in Austin, Texas, with her husband, George, and son, Gabriel.


DAUGHTER OF A DAUGHTER OF A QUEEN by Sarah Bird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 4, 2018

"Rapturously imagined and shamelessly entertaining."
Lightly based on the true story of a freed female slave who posed as a man, joined the army, and served with the Buffalo Soldiers, this rollicking epic marches fearlessly from the Civil War South to the sunburned edge of the Western frontier. Read full book review >
ABOVE THE EAST CHINA SEA by Sarah Bird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 27, 2014

"An admirable study of war's impact on and legacy in an underdiscussed place."
The devastating Battle of Okinawa looms large in the lives of two young women—one who lived through the carnage, another who is absorbing its spiritual aftereffects. Read full book review >
THE GAP YEAR by Sarah Bird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2011

"Disappointing. Wit and feistiness collapse into cotton candy."
The daughter's side of the story, told in parallel with her mother's, fills in the gaps in a smart, soft-centered, strung-out tale of parental stand-off and reconciliation. Read full book review >
HOW PERFECT IS THAT by Sarah Bird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 12, 2008

"Jolly ho-down spoiled by sermonizing."
Addled Texas socialite hits rock bottom. Read full book review >
THE FLAMENCO ACADEMY by Sarah Bird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 8, 2006

"Funny and beautifully structured to create anticipation and suspense, with lush moments of romance and a surprisingly sturdy backbone."
The author of five previous novels (The Yokota Officers Club, 2001, etc.) that center around romance, friendship, career, art, motherhood and personal appearance here writes compellingly of a love triangle. Read full book review >
THE YOKOTA OFFICERS CLUB by Sarah Bird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 27, 2001

"Bernie is an original with her own voice, a believably awkward mix of sassy attitude and breathless insights, but she marches too much in lockstep with her creator's overly schematic plotting. Like everyone else, she's under orders."
A military brat recalls the summer she finally made the break from Mom, Dad, and the Brass—in a fifth appearance for the author of The Mommy Club (1991), etc. Read full book review >
VIRGIN OF THE RODEO by Sarah Bird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

The author of The Mommy Club (1991), etc., ventures deep into farcical territory with a Pecos-Bill-style tale—about a Texas misfit who joins the rodeo to find her long-lost father. Sonja Getz would always be out of place in a town like Dorfburg, Texas—the spot where her mother, minuscule Tinka Getz, washed ashore and shortly afterwards gave birth. An adorable blond FrÑulein whose fascination with noble savages led to an unwise affair with a quarter-breed American serviceman in Germany, Tinka landed in Texas unwed and pregnant, but was embraced nevertheless by the sentimental German-Americans she found there. Big-boned, book-addicted Sonja, on the other hand, was left to grow up in utter solitude, comforting herself with fantasies of her absent father, whom she assumed from a publicity photo found in her mother's dresser to be a Navajo trick roper, stoically referring to herself as a woman of color, and operating a faltering pest-control business. When Tinka remarries and kicks 29-year-old Sonja out, the dour young woman marches off to the local rodeo, where she hires quarrelsome trick roper Prairie James to help her find her dad. The mismatched pair rumble across Texas and New Mexico in James's rusty van with his horse, Domino, riding in back, ducking into various rodeos along the way to chat it up with such satisfying potential fathers as wizened old Cootie Ramos and Prairie's former roping mentor, El Marinero. In the end, Sonja learns the horrible truth behind her parentage—but since by that time she's discovered her own amazing talent for rodeo announcing, fallen in love with a refreshment-booth proprietor, and helped rescue Prairie James from his muddled past, the bad news has little effect. Bird's extra-broad, cartoon-like humor here may disappoint ``Mommy Club'' fans—but it's probably safe to say that no one's ever invented a rodeo gal like this before. Read full book review >
THE MOMMY CLUB by Sarah Bird
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 21, 1991

Bird (Alamo House, 1986; The Boyfriend School, 1986) outdoes herself with this hilarious, deadpan account of a Texan artist's attempt at surrogate motherhood-a warm, wise, and witty comedy by an author who's finally his her stride. Spaced-out San Antonio artist Trudy Herring is no one's idea of a perfect mother. She drifts from one unemployment check to another while creating weird objets d`art from other people's trash (a plastic Christ figure covered with plastic ants, called the Antychrist, for example). Her only regret, in fact, is a promise she made ten years ago: Forced to have an abortion, she vowed to the baby's spirit (nicknamed Sweet Pea) that she'd get her life together someday and bring it back. Now, at 38, Trudy despairs of making good on her guarantee. Salvation appears in the person of Hillary Goettler, Trudy's new boss of the Museum of Folk Art, a woman who dresses spectacularly, lives in a historic San Antonio mansion, is married into one of the city's oldest families and is cursed with infertility. Trudy offers to become a surrogate mother for Hillary, and before she can think twice she's been inseminated, ensconced in the Goettler home, clothed in all-cotton maternity jumpsuits, and crammed full of foul- tasting health-food dinners. Not surprisingly, Trudy and Hillary soon loathe each other, and Trudy begins sneaking out of the mansion to gorge on Mexican good and daydream about Sinclair Coker, the long-gone artist/boyfriend who sired Sweet Pea. At last Trudy finds him again-an overweight ex-gigolo hiding out at a condemned hot-springs spa-and must decide whether to give the new Sweet Pea a life of shallow luxury or one surrounded by questionable art objects, unpredictability and love. A wonderful take, placing Bird squarely among the best of Texas writers. Read full book review >
THE BOYFRIEND SCHOOL by Sarah Bird
Released: March 22, 1989

This tongue-in-cheek foray into the world of Texan romance writers has a problem: some of the book reads like a romance novel itself. Its characters can be endearing, and there are whacked-out zany moments, but Bird (Alamo House, 1986) finally lets too much cutesiness spoil the soup. Gretchen Griner, a photojournalist with the Austin Grackle, a dilapidated biweekly, is assigned by her editor (and philandering lover) Trout to cover a romance writers' convention, the Luvboree, in Dallas. Instead of stereotypes, Gretchen meets Juanita Lusada and Lizzie Potts—two savvy, hard-boiled creatures who become her fairy godmothers. Gretchen, of course, gets the romance bug herself after sensuality workshops, costume parties, lots of shrieking, and a primer course where she (along with the reader) learns the ins and outs of romance publishing. Gretchen studies the romances and then writes to "transcend" them. She develops Hattie, her alter-ego heroine, and from that point the book alternates between her inventions and real life. Lizzie's brother, Gus, has chased Gretchen from the moment they've met, and she's fled from him; but, hungry for a boyfriend, she meets Rye St. John, a "natural man" from New Zealand, and falls head over heels. He won't sleep with her, though. Is he gay? Well, no. Is he married? No, not married. He's Gus, in disguise, a "handsome rogue" romance fantasy that her fairy godmothers have helped create. Quite a trick, of course—different accent, more muscles, etc.—but not to worry: we (as well as Gretchen) get to read Gus' journal, and he explains it all. Gretchen will finish writing her romance and decide, natch, that she wants Rye, or Gus, as is. Happy ending #23. Strictly for romance writers, would-be writers, and their fans. Read full book review >