Books by Seamus Heaney

FINDERS KEEPERS by Seamus Heaney
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 1, 2001

"A must for poets and students of poetry and a good start for initiates seeking to understand the constituent parts of its erudite codes."
A wonderful collection of the great Irish poet and critic's learned yet down-to-earth prose. Read full book review >
THE MIDNIGHT VERDICT by Brian Merriman
Released: April 9, 2001

Heaney's previous efforts have included "works of lyrical beauty and ethical depth, which exalt everyday miracles and the living past," for which he won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. Read full book review >

ELECTRIC LIGHT by Seamus Heaney
Released: April 1, 2001

Nobel Laureate Heaney (Beowulf, 2000, etc.) has called words tools for digging, and his language usually has the tactility of a good toolkit. Read full book review >

DIARY OF ONE WHO VANISHED by Ozef Kalda
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

In a follow-up to his grand translation of Beowulf, Heaney brings to English a tiny cycle of Czech love poems made famous by Janacek, who first set them to music in 1919. Read full book review >

BEOWULF by Seamus Heaney
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

Written more than a thousand years ago in the Germanic tongue from which the preNorman core of modern English is formed, Beowulf is the epic poem of the warrior hero who survived a succession of fierce trials only to languish for centuries thereafter in the entombing clutches of university scholars. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

A laurel wreath for Frost hoisted by several Nobel laureates whose own poetry is published regularly by Farrar, Straus & Giroux. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

Ten Oxford University lectures on poetry from Heaney, perhaps the best-known Irish poet in America. Think of it as a transcontinental overview of English (Welsh, Irish, Scottish, and American) poetry: George Herbert, Christopher Marlowe, John Clare, Brian Merriman (an 18th century Irish poet relatively unknown to American readers), up through Hugh MacDiarmid, Philip Larkin, and Elizabeth Bishop. Read full book review >