Books by Sharon E. McKay

PRISON BOY by Sharon E. McKay
Released: March 15, 2015

"Another gut-wrenching tale from McKay (War Brothers, 2014, etc.) focusing on children victimized by war and poverty. (Fiction. 12-14)"
What chances have abandoned children to survive the hazards of life on the mean streets of an unnamed developing country riven by civil war? Read full book review >
THE END OF THE LINE by Sharon E. McKay
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Oct. 15, 2014

"This is a solid addition to one of the most uneven collections of literature for children: Holocaust-related historical fiction. (foreword, afterword) (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
Two kindhearted, confirmed-bachelor brothers take in an endangered little Jewish girl during the Nazi occupation of Amsterdam. Read full book review >
WAR BROTHERS by Sharon E. McKay
Released: July 1, 2014

"This gripping story will have readers questioning humanity in the midst of evil and death. (glossary) (Historical fiction. 14-18)"
"My story is not an easy one to tell, and it is not an easy one to read." Read full book review >
WAR BROTHERS by Sharon E. McKay
Released: March 1, 2013

"Powerful storytelling based on documented experiences; despite being set in 2002, it's as relevant as ever since the LRA is still all-too-active. (afterword) (Graphic historical fiction. 12-15)"
A graphic format adds heart-rending images to McKay's violent 2008 tale of children kidnapped and forced to become soldiers in Uganda. Read full book review >
ENEMY TERRITORY by Sharon E. McKay
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"Slim but powerful. (map, notes, postscript) (Adventure. 10 & up)"
Two boys who have been taught to hate each other are thrown together in a Jerusalem hospital. Read full book review >
THUNDER OVER KANDAHAR by Sharon E. McKay
FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"Readers will be caught up—though it's so misanthropic that many will wonder how anyone, especially women, could tolerate living in that country. (glossary, timeline) (Fiction. 11-13)"
This suspenseful tale of two young women on their own in modern Afghanistan makes riveting reading. Read full book review >