Books by William Gibson

DISTRUST THAT PARTICULAR FLAVOR by William Gibson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 3, 2012

"A provocative, surprising look at the lesser-known parts of a sci-fi superstar's writing career."
Cyberpunk's patron saint of prose proves that his reality is every bit as trippy as his fiction. Read full book review >
ZERO HISTORY by William Gibson
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 7, 2010

"Unsettling and memorable, weird flaws and all."
Gibson's third thriller-ish novel set in the present day (Spook Country, 2007, etc.)—like its predecessors, post-modern, post-structural, almost post-speculative. Read full book review >
SPOOK COUNTRY by William Gibson
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 7, 2007

"Readable and mildly engaging, but not the kind of cutting-edge work we expect from Gibson."
The SF innovator follows up his mainstream success (Pattern Recognition, 2003) with another novel set in the near-present, as three separate groups chase after a mysterious freight container. Read full book review >
PATTERN RECOGNITION by William Gibson
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"A slick but surprisingly humane piece of work from the father of cyberpunk."
A return to the present makes this SF scribe more prescient than ever. Read full book review >
ALL TOMORROW'S PARTIES by William Gibson
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

More ultra-cool cyberpunk, sort of a sequel to Virtual Light (1993) and Idoru (1996). Read full book review >

IDORU by William Gibson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Markedly more relaxed and cordial, and less aggressively high-tech, than hitherto—even the plotting's improved: highly approachable, engaging, and persuasive."
Cyberspace and virtual-reality guru Gibson's new venture is set in the same near-future as Virtual Light (1993) and has at least one of the characters in common. Read full book review >
VIRTUAL LIGHT by William Gibson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

Near-future good little-guys vs. bad redevelopers tussle—set in a California split into two states: from the cyberspace and virtual reality guru (Mona Lisa Overdrive, 1988; The Difference Engine, 1991, with Bruce Sterling, etc.). By the year 2005, the middle classes have vanished, leaving a vast struggling mass of impoverished workers or unemployed, with the amoral rich insulated by their purchasing power from the social Darwinistic carnage below. Read full book review >

THE DIFFERENCE ENGINE by William Gibson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 4, 1990

In their first major collaboration, sf heavyweights Gibson and Sterling spin an exquisitely clever filigree of Victorian alternate history, sparkling densely with ideas, moored by a challenging subtext of chaos theory and the lessons of recent paleontology. Read full book review >

MONA LISA OVERDRIVE by William Gibson
Released: Nov. 1, 1988

"This one probably won't win over any new fans, but the many extant will be delighted."
Another brilliant, gritty, densely textured novel from the author of Neuromancer (paperback, 1984; Hugo, Nebula, P.K. Dick awards) and Count Zero (1986). Read full book review >
BURNING CHROME by William Gibson
Released: April 29, 1986

"Alluring stuff—if you happen to be on Gibson's sharply delimited wavelength."
Ten tales, 1977-85—Gibson's entire output to date—including three collaborations. Read full book review >
COUNT ZERO by William Gibson
Released: March 26, 1986

"However, the ideas that gave Neuromancer its sparkle are, here, just about played out."
Something like a cross between Gibson's hugely successful debut, Neuromancer (paperback only), and his short story about futuristic corporate dirty tricks, "New Rose Hotel." Read full book review >
SHAKESPEARE'S GAME by William Gibson
Released: Oct. 1, 1978

"For the rest, we'll have to applaud playwright Gibson's assurance that this is his "first and last book as a critic."
What the world doesn't need: another set of jargon phrases to use in diagramming the life out of Shakespeare's plays. Read full book review >
A SEASON IN HEAVEN by William Gibson
Released: June 1, 1974

"Uninitiates less tolerant than Gibson may find the discipline preparatory to enlightenment a new and distressing form of totalitarianism — even if everyone around the Maharishi wears a beatific smile."
A season at a remote Spanish seacoast where Gibson (The Miracle Worker; Two For the Seesaw) came to find his wandering 19-year-old son at Maharishi International University and, mirabile dictu, joined up for a course on "creative intelligence" and "cosmic consciousness" — the end reward promised to the disciples when they have put in enough hours meditating, "rounding" and memorizing the Master's cryptic utterances. Read full book review >
MASS FOR THE DEAD by William Gibson
Released: March 25, 1968

"Literary Guild selection and expected wide appeal."
Playwright (The Miracle Worker: Two For the Seesaw) Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 27, 1960

"This for the audience away from Broadway- accustomed to getting their plays from the printed page."
Two plays- in book form — with a preface by the playwright, best known perhaps for Two for the See-Saw. Read full book review >
THE COBWEB by William Gibson
Released: March 8, 1954

"The publishers promise strong support but conservatives may wish to exercise restraint."
An intense first novel grapples with some major motives- love and self-love, patronage and power, responsibility and guilt, through the personnel at a small clinic for nervous disorders in Nebraska. Read full book review >