Books by Willow Dawson

THE WOLF-BIRDS by Willow Dawson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"An interesting, contemplative addition to the nature shelf. (author's note) (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
A pair of hungry ravens helps wolves hunt during the winter starving time. Read full book review >
AVIS DOLPHIN by Frieda Wishinsky
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 14, 2015

"Arty illustrations and a turgid, purpose-driven narrative waste this opportunity to highlight a major tragedy in its centennial year. Interested readers will get more from Diana Preston's Remember the Lusitania! (2003). (afterword) (Historical fiction. 9-11)"
Readers who think that the Titanic was the only great ocean liner that ever sank will find this fictionalized eyewitness account of the torpedoed Lusitania's last voyage a revelation.Read full book review >
THE BIG GREEN BOOK OF THE BIG BLUE SEA by Helaine Becker
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2012

"The sheer breadth of information presented here and its appealing format make this an invaluable resource, especially when accompanied by a knowledgeable adult to guide and correct. (table of contents, index) (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
Bite-sized pieces of information and hands-on explorations teach readers all about the sea, from its composition and currents to its problems and energy potential. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

This collective biography in graphic form depicts the lives of seven women from a range of eras and cultures who each reached the conclusion that they could only attain their goals by posing as men. Featuring both historical figures that may be recognizable to kids (Ellen Craft, Mu Lan) and those more obscure (Hatshepsut, Alfhild), the collection offers a succinct overview of each. Early on, a pedantic tone is established that seems at odds with the graphic format and distances readers by telling them rather than allowing them to experience these stories ("Hatshepsut slowly transformed her public image"). Readers with particular interest in women's history, however, will find that Hughes's simple language and Dawson's clean, black-and-white ink drawings steer the work in the same no-nonsense direction and do an adequate job of presenting this uniquely themed offering. Source notes are not included, though there is a short list of further reading and a largely superfluous afterword. (Graphic biography. 8-12)Read full book review >