Books by Susan Hughes

WALKING IN THE CITY WITH JANE by Susan Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 3, 2018

"An inspiring and appealing snapshot of a strong woman and activist, her world and her legacy, told with warmth and charm. (Picture book/biography. 4-8)"
A city is more than the sum of its parts! Read full book review >
WHAT HAPPENS NEXT by Susan Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2018

"It's impossible to find a solution that will solve every bullying situation, but empathy is always a fine place to start. (Picture book. 5-8)"
An internal monologue recounts an episode of bullying. Read full book review >
UP! by Susan Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 15, 2017

"A celebration of baby love as it's carried out all over the world. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Diverse caregivers and babies populate this picture-book depiction of caring and carrying. Read full book review >
MAKING CANADA HOME by Susan Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"An astute educator or parent can use this book to start important conversations about Canada's history and its people. (timeline, immigration laws, statistics, further reading, glossary) (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
Just in time for the 150th anniversary of Canada, Hughes traces the history and impact of immigration in the country. Read full book review >
MAGGIE MCGILLICUDDY'S EYE FOR TROUBLE by Susan Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Friendship between a little boy and an old lady is a lovely thing, but the story lacks cohesion and purpose. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A neighborhood busybody "keeps an eye out for trouble." Read full book review >
FOUR SEASONS OF PATRICK by Susan Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2014

"In spite of flaws in the presentation, Patrick's gradual adjustment to his new family may offer a satisfying road map for chapter-book readers dealing with similar situations. (Fiction. 7-9)"
Over the course of four evocatively described seasons, Patrick must come to grips with his father's intention to remarry, to a woman with a 7-year-old daughter, Claire, he views as a pest-y interloper. Read full book review >
THE ISLAND HORSE by Susan Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"A few shipwrecks and less hand-wringing, and you'd have a good story. (Historical fiction. 7-10)"
Another misunderstood child. Another friendly stallion. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2011

"Unusual and useful. (acknowledgements, credits, index, map) (Nonfiction. 9-13)"
Surprising schools to be found around the world include new schools that work with the environment, schools in places where none existed and schools that meet children more than halfway. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

This collective biography in graphic form depicts the lives of seven women from a range of eras and cultures who each reached the conclusion that they could only attain their goals by posing as men. Featuring both historical figures that may be recognizable to kids (Ellen Craft, Mu Lan) and those more obscure (Hatshepsut, Alfhild), the collection offers a succinct overview of each. Early on, a pedantic tone is established that seems at odds with the graphic format and distances readers by telling them rather than allowing them to experience these stories ("Hatshepsut slowly transformed her public image"). Readers with particular interest in women's history, however, will find that Hughes's simple language and Dawson's clean, black-and-white ink drawings steer the work in the same no-nonsense direction and do an adequate job of presenting this uniquely themed offering. Source notes are not included, though there is a short list of further reading and a largely superfluous afterword. (Graphic biography. 8-12)Read full book review >
EARTH TO AUDREY by Susan Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

Catching sight of his summer neighbor sticking her face into a stream, a lad decides that she must be a space alien, and hastens to make her acquaintance. Poulin reinforces young Ray's notion by casting Audrey with dreamy eyes, brightly patterned clothes and wildly crooked red braids—but provides clues to her odd behavior with glimpses of her father welding sculpture in the garage, and of exuberantly painted walls and doors in her house. Following his new friend's lead, Ray begins to see his ordinary world with new eyes—learning to appreciate the many shades of green all around, for instance. Their faces modeled and polished like carved puppets, the two occupy an idyllic small-town setting, with visual references to the art of Edward Hopper and Andrew Wyeth adding both a sense of timelessness and a hint of mystery. At summer's end, though Audrey and her family supposedly drive off in a highly decorated minivan, Ray keeps an eye out for clues that she's still somewhere close. A sweet celebration of summer, of pleasantly unpredictable new friends and of the pleasures of taking fresh looks at everyday things. (Picture book. 6-8)Read full book review >