THE LITTLE GREEN GOOSE

In this significantly revised and newly illustrated edition of a 1999 import, a gander who yearns to be a Dad gets his wish when an untended dragon egg turns up. The scaly green hatchling bonds instantly with his feathered parent, and even though the local hens’ declaration that he’s not a “proper goose” sends him off on a brief search for his “real daddy,” he returns contentedly to Mr. Goose at the end. Said hatchling is much smaller and more childlike in Faust’s bright, strongly textured, collaged barnyard scenes (Mr. Goose’s body is filled in with photographed feathers) than in Alan Marks’s more impressionistic originals, and the revelation that Mr. Goose is a father (not a mom) has moved from the closing scene to right up front at the hatching—a male single parent being less of a stretch these days, perhaps. Both versions make low-key, indirect ways of introducing younger children to the ideas of single parenthood and of mixed-race (not to mention -species) adoption. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: May 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-7358-2292-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: NorthSouth

Review Posted Online: Dec. 30, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2010

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Should be packaged with an oxygen supply, as it will incontestably elicit uncontrollable gales of giggles.

THE DINKY DONKEY

Even more alliterative hanky-panky from the creators of The Wonky Donkey (2010).

Operating on the principle (valid, here) that anything worth doing is worth overdoing, Smith and Cowley give their wildly popular Wonky Donkey a daughter—who, being “cute and small,” was a “dinky donkey”; having “beautiful long eyelashes” she was in consequence a “blinky dinky donkey”; and so on…and on…and on until the cumulative chorus sails past silly and ludicrous to irresistibly hysterical: “She was a stinky funky plinky-plonky winky-tinky,” etc. The repeating “Hee Haw!” chorus hardly suggests what any audience’s escalating response will be. In the illustrations the daughter sports her parent’s big, shiny eyes and winsome grin while posing in a multicolored mohawk next to a rustic boombox (“She was a punky blinky”), painting her hooves pink, crossing her rear legs to signal a need to pee (“winky-tinky inky-pinky”), demonstrating her smelliness with the help of a histrionic hummingbird, and finally cozying up to her proud, evidently single parent (there’s no sign of another) for a closing cuddle.

Should be packaged with an oxygen supply, as it will incontestably elicit uncontrollable gales of giggles. (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: Nov. 5, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-338-60083-4

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Oct. 13, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2019

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WAITING FOR BABY

One of a four-book series designed to help the very young prepare for new siblings, this title presents a toddler-and-mother pair (the latter heavily pregnant) as they read about new babies, sort hand-me-downs, buy new toys, visit the obstetrician and the sonographer, speculate and wait. Throughout, the child asks questions and makes exclamations with complete enthusiasm: “How big is the baby? What does it eat? I felt it move! Is it a boy or girl?” Fuller’s jolly pictures present a biracial family that thoroughly enjoys every moment together. It’s a bit oversimplified, but no one can complain about the positive message it conveys, appropriately, to its baby and toddler audience. The other titles in the New Baby series are My New Baby (ISBN: 978-1-84643-276-7), Look at Me! (ISBN: 978-1-84643-278-1) and You and Me (ISBN: 978-1-84643-277-4). (Board book. 18 mos.-3)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-1-84643-275-0

Page Count: 12

Publisher: Child's Play

Review Posted Online: June 3, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2010

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