A story that is, paradoxically, low-key and intense.

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LAISH

A quiet narrative of high expectation and muted desperation from Israeli writer Appelfeld (All Whom I Have Loved, 2007, etc.).

Set in a vaguely pre-war period in the 20th century, the book recounts the journey of a caravan meandering through Eastern Europe and trying to get to Jerusalem, which is continually held out as a promised land of health and healing. As Sruel, one of the de facto leaders of the convoy comments, “Everything is filthy except for Jerusalem.” The eponymous Laish, an adolescent orphan, narrates his story of despair and hope. Appelfeld writes in an unadorned yet forceful style, taking Laish and his companions through a series of adventures that are too subtle to be called harrowing; still, they test the mettle of the Jewish vagabonds involved in the journey. Some of the conflicts involve traders dabbling in shady business deals that bring in money for the continuation of the pilgrimage. One of the original leaders dies, leaving Laish a book in which to record the deaths of others, not exactly a propitious beginning for the journey. Other forces are also at work to pull apart the group—attacks by hostile ethnic subcultures, for example, and rain and plague. Laish is also tempted by the distractions of wine and women, going so far as to steal money from Blind Menachem in an anguished attempt to recover Maya, a prostitute he’d encountered in a city along the way. Eventually the travelers hear rumors of the possibility of taking a ship to Jerusalem, so the few remaining members sell their wagons and horses and go to Galacz to await a ship. There they’re forced to commit one last desperate act to ensure their survival, one that while not overly noticeable in the grand scheme of their journey is nonetheless fraught with pain.

A story that is, paradoxically, low-key and intense.

Pub Date: March 10, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-8052-4159-4

Page Count: 240

Publisher: Schocken

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2009

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ANIMAL FARM

A FAIRY STORY

A modern day fable, with modern implications in a deceiving simplicity, by the author of Dickens. Dali and Others (Reynal & Hitchcock, p. 138), whose critical brilliance is well adapted to this type of satire. This tells of the revolt on a farm, against humans, when the pigs take over the intellectual superiority, training the horses, cows, sheep, etc., into acknowledging their greatness. The first hints come with the reading out of a pig who instigated the building of a windmill, so that the electric power would be theirs, the idea taken over by Napoleon who becomes topman with no maybes about it. Napoleon trains the young puppies to be his guards, dickers with humans, gradually instigates a reign of terror, and breaks the final commandment against any animal walking on two legs. The old faithful followers find themselves no better off for food and work than they were when man ruled them, learn their final disgrace when they see Napoleon and Squealer carousing with their enemies... A basic statement of the evils of dictatorship in that it not only corrupts the leaders, but deadens the intelligence and awareness of those led so that tyranny is inevitable. Mr. Orwell's animals exist in their own right, with a narrative as individual as it is apt in political parody.

Pub Date: Aug. 26, 1946

ISBN: 0452277507

Page Count: 114

Publisher: Harcourt, Brace

Review Posted Online: Nov. 2, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1946

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NORMAL PEOPLE

A young Irish couple gets together, splits up, gets together, splits up—sorry, can't tell you how it ends!

Irish writer Rooney has made a trans-Atlantic splash since publishing her first novel, Conversations With Friends, in 2017. Her second has already won the Costa Novel Award, among other honors, since it was published in Ireland and Britain last year. In outline it's a simple story, but Rooney tells it with bravura intelligence, wit, and delicacy. Connell Waldron and Marianne Sheridan are classmates in the small Irish town of Carricklea, where his mother works for her family as a cleaner. It's 2011, after the financial crisis, which hovers around the edges of the book like a ghost. Connell is popular in school, good at soccer, and nice; Marianne is strange and friendless. They're the smartest kids in their class, and they forge an intimacy when Connell picks his mother up from Marianne's house. Soon they're having sex, but Connell doesn't want anyone to know and Marianne doesn't mind; either she really doesn't care, or it's all she thinks she deserves. Or both. Though one time when she's forced into a social situation with some of their classmates, she briefly fantasizes about what would happen if she revealed their connection: "How much terrifying and bewildering status would accrue to her in this one moment, how destabilising it would be, how destructive." When they both move to Dublin for Trinity College, their positions are swapped: Marianne now seems electric and in-demand while Connell feels adrift in this unfamiliar environment. Rooney's genius lies in her ability to track her characters' subtle shifts in power, both within themselves and in relation to each other, and the ways they do and don't know each other; they both feel most like themselves when they're together, but they still have disastrous failures of communication. "Sorry about last night," Marianne says to Connell in February 2012. Then Rooney elaborates: "She tries to pronounce this in a way that communicates several things: apology, painful embarrassment, some additional pained embarrassment that serves to ironise and dilute the painful kind, a sense that she knows she will be forgiven or is already, a desire not to 'make a big deal.' " Then: "Forget about it, he says." Rooney precisely articulates everything that's going on below the surface; there's humor and insight here as well as the pleasure of getting to know two prickly, complicated people as they try to figure out who they are and who they want to become.

Absolutely enthralling. Read it.

Pub Date: April 16, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-984-82217-8

Page Count: 288

Publisher: Hogarth/Crown

Review Posted Online: Feb. 18, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2019

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