ON TOP OF THE POTTY

AND OTHER GET-UP-AND-GO SONGS

Katz and Catrow’s fifth song collection has all the punch and visual impact of the previous works, but the duo may finally have crossed the line in terms of content. While elementary-age readers will laugh themselves senseless, adults who are attempting to potty-train toddlers may not appreciate the gross references (“People poopy / Squooshy brown”), the glib way Katz deals with setbacks (“My friend Mike / Just went poop / On his next-door-neighbor’s stoop / There’s no problem / ’Cause they know / He’s getting potty trained / And this whole week it has rained.”), or the ideas these songs may put into youngsters’ heads (“Don’t Flush Strange Things in the Potty” is the title of one of the songs). Exceptions include a great handwashing song to the tune of “Row, Row, Row Your Boat,” “On Top of the Potty,” which details one kid’s endless wait for something to happen and the trademark tune found in every book, “Go Do Poop in the Toilet” (“Take me Out to the Ballgame”). Several verses within songs also shine, but parents will want to carefully preview all songs before putting on a show for their little toileteers. (Picture book/songs. 2-8)

Pub Date: March 25, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-689-86215-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: McElderry

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2008

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Cooperation makes cleaning go much faster—particularly with friendly, rhyming llamas to show the way.

LLAMA LLAMA MESS MESS MESS

From the Llama Llama series

Llama Llama learns why tidying is important.

In yet another highly familiar childhood drama, Llama Llama does not want to clean up his toys. He’s having fun playing; why should he stop? Isn’t it Mama Llama’s job to clean up? Mama poses the question: “What if Mama never cleaned? / Imagine that! / What would that mean?” Mama zooms off on her roller skates, with a sheet for a cape, crunching snacks and dropping everything on the floor. Soon the house is strewn with toys, dirty dishes, and trash. “Crumbs and clothes and peanut shells… / What’s this thing? What’s that smell?” Llama Llama can’t take it anymore. “No more Llama / MESS / MESS / MESS!” Perhaps it is a good idea for Llama Llama to lend a hand. Helpful hints for youngsters are slipped inside: Every toy should have a place, and when making your bed, don’t forget to look underneath. This second collaboration between Duncan and Morrow since Dewdney’s passing feels more complete than Llama Llama Loves to Read (2018), with snappy rhythms and a twinkle in Mama’s eye. Returning to Llama Llama and Mama’s relationship feels like home.

Cooperation makes cleaning go much faster—particularly with friendly, rhyming llamas to show the way. (Picture book. 2-6)

Pub Date: Aug. 20, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-670-01644-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: May 12, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2019

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

THE POTTY TRAIN

The latest addition to toilet-training literature takes the train analogy and rides the rails to success . . . one hopes. A toddler engineer is playing with his toy train and stuffed giraffe, lion and elephant (all diapered) when he feels a sudden urge. Opening the bathroom door leads him to the station where the Potty Train awaits with Conductor Lion beckoning him aboard. Giraffe doesn’t quite make it in time, but that’s okay—learning to ride takes a while. Sometimes there are leaks, and sometimes nothing seems to be happening at all. But the potty train keeps going, and soon, the little boy will be able to ride it all the time. As he disembarks with his stuffed friends, the toddler is surprised to see that they are all now wearing underwear. Young children will enjoy the inventiveness of Anderson’s acrylic illustrations, which incorporate everyday objects and toys into a fantasy train ride that marks the journey from diapers to “Undie Junction.” One page is potentially problematic, however, as it shows the train about to chug through a pipe tunnel. Nonetheless, train enthusiasts will toot “Chugga chugga poo-poo.” (Picture book. 2-4)

Pub Date: Jan. 8, 2008

ISBN: 978-1-4169-2833-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Simon Pulse/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2007

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more