THE DOORS OF PERCEPTION by Aldous Huxley

THE DOORS OF PERCEPTION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A personal, and expectedly individualistic, description of his experiment with the drug mescalin, which induces a state of pleasant, mild intoxication- and opens the doors of perception. Believing that modern man, enmeshed in his own ego and vulgar environment, needs an occasional escape- he recommends mescalin as a pleasanter and less harmful indulgence than alcohol or narcotics- or yogi. In this recommendation, he also pursues his latest ideas about art, music, philosophy, modern life and mysticism. And one of his most original ideas is that the human brain is a sort of valve which repels all the sensations, radiations and perceptions which are at large in the universe so that the individual will not be overwhelmed by these magnitudes and magnificences. On the other hand, the valve must be bypassed occasionally, so that the individual may have a glimpse of wider perspectives than his five senses ordinarily afford- and mescalin is the medium to be used. All this cannot be taken too seriously- but it makes amusing reading as well as a controversial commentary on current intellectual preoccupations. His addicts, but not in full strength, will provide the market.
Pub Date: Jan. 1st, 1954
ISBN: 0006547311
Page count: 135pp
Publisher: Harper
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15th, 1953




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