THE WORST BEST FRIEND

Longtime best friends Conrad and Mike do everything together: They “ate together / Read together / Played together...” Until Victor joins their class. Their new, big, bold schoolmate brags and blabs and excels at just about everything he tries. As Conrad puts it, “He—is—awesome!” Pretty soon, it’s Conrad and Victor who “walked together / Ate together / Played together— / No room for Mike.” Huliska-Beith tackles this age-old psychodrama with bright, textured illustrations that incorporate Victor’s incessant, pervasive boasting: “Me, Me, Me...Wow, Wow, Wow...Blah, Blah, Blah” swirls around him, Joe Cool sunglasses marking him as the grandstander he is. Environmental print—written details on the blackboard or book titles—adds fizz. A showdown game of kickball convinces Conrad and Mike that winning or losing has nothing to do with being best friends and that loyalty is its own reward. While there’s little new in this insight, the message bears repeating, and the delivery in this volume provides plenty of zing. The ending “high five” says it all. (Picture book. 5-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-545-01023-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2008

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

JOE LOUIS, MY CHAMPION

One of the watershed moments in African-American history—the defeat of James Braddock at the hands of Joe Louis—is here given an earnest picture-book treatment. Despite his lack of athletic ability, Sammy wants desperately to be a great boxer, like his hero, getting boxing lessons from his friend Ernie in exchange for help with schoolwork. However hard he tries, though, Sammy just can’t box, and his father comforts him, reminding him that he doesn’t need to box: Joe Louis has shown him that he “can be the champion at anything [he] want[s].” The high point of this offering is the big fight itself, everyone crowded around the radio in Mister Jake’s general store, the imagined fight scenes played out in soft-edged sepia frames. The main story, however, is so bent on providing Sammy and the reader with object lessons that all subtlety is lost, as Mister Jake, Sammy’s father, and even Ernie hammer home the message. Both text and oil-on-canvas-paper illustrations go for the obvious angle, making the effort as a whole worthy, but just a little too heavy-handed. (Picture book. 5-8)

Pub Date: May 1, 2004

ISBN: 1-58430-161-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Lee & Low Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2004

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

BECAUSE YOUR DADDY LOVES YOU

Give this child’s-eye view of a day at the beach with an attentive father high marks for coziness: “When your ball blows across the sand and into the ocean and starts to drift away, your daddy could say, Didn’t I tell you not to play too close to the waves? But he doesn’t. He wades out into the cold water. And he brings your ball back to the beach and plays roll and catch with you.” Alley depicts a moppet and her relaxed-looking dad (to all appearances a single parent) in informally drawn beach and domestic settings: playing together, snuggling up on the sofa and finally hugging each other goodnight. The third-person voice is a bit distancing, but it makes the togetherness less treacly, and Dad’s mix of love and competence is less insulting, to parents and children both, than Douglas Wood’s What Dads Can’t Do (2000), illus by Doug Cushman. (Picture book. 5-7)

Pub Date: May 23, 2005

ISBN: 0-618-00361-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Clarion Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2005

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more