For readers too busy to cook or those simply seeking fresh and tasty ideas.

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ALICE'S COOKBOOK

From the New Voices in Food series

A cookbook filled with recipes to nourish a busy lifestyle.

Stop eating prepackaged pasta because you have no time to cook, writes the author. Don't miss all the jokes at the dinner party because you are sweating it out over the stove. Food editor Hart thinks spending time with friends and family is made great by sharing a fantastic meal. To pull this off, the author prepares most meals early. “This advance prepping is my way of picking a path through life's vicissitudes, with sanity somewhat intact and delectable food on the table,” she writes in the introduction to her debut cookbook. Hart follows that up with easy-to-follow menus and recipes for seasonal lunches, portable breakfasts and parties, among other occasions. She breaks down exact prep time, as well as how long a recipe can be refrigerated. The author has even manipulated recipes so that multiple items can be in the oven at the same time and temperature. The recipe for Quick Damper Bread Dipping Sticks, meant to be cooked over a campfire, includes tips on how to transport prepped ingredients to the wilderness. The author's menu for an Autumn Sunday Lunch for Six includes Carmelized Baby Roots, Feta and Sweet Lemon Dressing; Slow-Roasted Red-Currant and Thyme Lamb Shoulder; Glazed Cabbage; Giant Yorkshire Pudding; and a Pear and Almond Tarte Tatin. To this feast, Hart folds in as many time-saving tips as possible and provides a minute-by-minute break down of how to get all of the dishes on the table by 2 p.m.

For readers too busy to cook or those simply seeking fresh and tasty ideas.

Pub Date: April 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-0-7627-7018-2

Page Count: 192

Publisher: Lyons Press

Review Posted Online: April 3, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2011

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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