BISCUIT WANTS TO PLAY

Golden-brown puppy Biscuit seems to have arrived at superstar status: a stack of related easy-reader titles about the puppy's activities and holidays, four more titles for spring 2001, and over a million Biscuit books in print. (Can the plush toy and animated TV series be far behind?) Capucilli (Biscuit's New Trick, 2000, etc.) has written another simple story about her cavorting canine, this time about his discovery of two playful kittens. Biscuit tries to get them to play puppy-style with a ball or a stick, but the kittens are more interested in chasing insects. The story ends with the kittens still chasing a butterfly, and Biscuit following after his new friends. This entry in the My First I Can Read series is at the emergent level for the newest readers, with simple, repetitive vocabulary and just a few words in large type on each page. The story line is necessarily simplistic due to the format requirements, but there is a clear plot with a subtle lesson about joining into play with others. Biscuit is a charming little fellow, like most puppies, and Schories captures his puppy antics with her conventional illustrations in pen and ink with a watercolor wash. One welcome touch in this series is the gender of Biscuit's owner, a dark-haired little girl (rather than the usual male main character in most easy reader series), joined here by her friend, an Asian girl. Traditional and sweet, just like homemade buttermilk biscuits with honey. (Easy reader. 4-7)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-06-028069-7

Page Count: 32

Publisher: HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2001

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

NEVER LET YOUR CAT MAKE LUNCH FOR YOU

If the lighthearted title doesn’t grab readers, the spirited illustrations will, as a young girl tells what can happen when a highly anthropomorphized orange cat—a whiz at making breakfast—overreaches and attempts lunch. No pet lover will quibble with a helpful cat or dog, especially one who is good in the kitchen. What can be quibbled with, however, is that the range of the cat’s abilities given in the text is contradicted by the illustrations. Pebbles, the cat, wields a cast iron frying pan with ease, but must spread the peanut butter with her paw “because she can’t hold a knife.” She makes “scrambled eggs and bacon the best,” but displays eggs that are sunny-side up. Onlookers may be so befuddled that they’ll miss the cat’s true culinary sins (anchovy and mouse garnishes) that have resulted in the narrator’s admonishment of the title. It’s a cute book, but a sloppy one. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 1999

ISBN: 1-883762-80-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Tricycle

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 1999

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

A challenging, unconventional, rewarding imagining of a jazz giant’s final years.

Crepuscule W/ Nellie

The relationships among jazz great Thelonious Monk; his wife, Nellie; and his friend and patron Baroness Pannonica de Koenigswarter are imagined in Milazzo’s debut novel.

Jazz is known as a musical form without form—improvisation and imagination replace structure and tradition. This novel mimics that concept, using various devices to imagine the relationships among Monk and those closest to him, including de Koenigswarter, who took him in during the last years of his life. In 1976, as his health deteriorated, the pianist came to Weehawken, New Jersey, to live with de Koenigswarter. The novel, like Monk’s work, is unconventional. It doesn’t contain chapters in the traditional sense but rather sections with titles like “Take #32” and “Rolls 1-6 (Negs. 500 – 563; 565 – 569; 572),” which lead into one another like the grooves of a vinyl album. Likewise, the book itself doesn’t include a beginning, middle, and end. Instead, it comprises diary entries, bits of conversation, telephone calls, handbills, and other scraps that either pick up a previous subject or introduce a new one. During his final years, Monk didn’t play the piano nor did he speak much. Similarly here, while he is clearly the sun around whom the others in the group orbit, he is rarely an active presence in his own story. When he does try to play the piano, the author makes clear—via striking, lush writing—that Monk is a diminished star on the verge of burnout: “The moan this Monk makes as he assays the notes again, a low attenuated fuss suggesting pain, arrests no one.” However, there are plenty of other stories to follow, such as Nellie’s ruminations on their life together and the baroness’s observations. Milazzo isn’t attempting historical accuracy so much as imagining a misunderstood life. Like jazz, the book isn’t for everyone, and it requires effort and time to digest and understand. However, also like jazz, the effort brings rewards.

A challenging, unconventional, rewarding imagining of a jazz giant’s final years.

Pub Date: Oct. 7, 2014

ISBN: 978-1937543600

Page Count: 408

Publisher: Jaded Ibis Press

Review Posted Online: May 7, 2015

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more