Books by Edith Grossman

THE DREAM OF THE CELT by Edith  Grossman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 12, 2012

"A dazzling novel of great intensity and power. "
The Celt in question is Sir Roger Casement, who advocated on behalf of oppressed natives of the Congo and of Amazonia, but when he turns his attention to the Irish Troubles in 1916, the British feel he's gone too far, so he's caught, tried and executed. Read full book review >
DESTINY AND DESIRE by Carlos Fuentes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 4, 2011

"A compelling novel by one of the masters of contemporary fiction."
A novel of substance about friendship, philosophy and politics set in the "thousand-headed hydra of Mexico City" from the prolific pen of distinguished man of letters Fuentes (The Death of Artemio Cruz, 2009, etc.). Read full book review >
RED APRIL by Santiago Roncagliolo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 28, 2009

"An angry, despairing dispatch, punctuated with illiterate notes from a killer and equally meaningless reports in bureaucratic doublespeak, from a land torn apart by civil war and official denial."
A latter-day Candide gets a crash course in Peruvian terrorism and counter-terrorism in Roncagliolo's precocious debut, winner of the 2006 Alfaguara Prize. Read full book review >
HAPPY FAMILIES by Carlos Fuentes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 30, 2008

"A lesser work than such fully achieved recent fictions as The Years with Laura Diaz and The Eagle's Throne, but of real interest as a Latin American little brother to John Dos Passos's U.S.A., the book that may have inspired it."
Sixteen cleverly varied short stories, separated by mostly free-verse interludes, form a broad image of modern Mexico in the latest fiction from that country's most prominent writer (The Eagle's Throne, 2006, etc.). Read full book review >
A MANUSCRIPT OF ASHES by Antonio Muñoz Molina
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

"A wearying, headache-inducing exercise in "literary" mystery."
Specters from the Spanish Civil War and the ghost of tragic love haunt the latest from award-winning Molina (In Her Absence, 2007, etc.). Read full book review >
THE BAD GIRL by Mario Vargas Llosa
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 2007

"A contemporary master remains at the top of his game."
The Peruvian-born author's latest novel is an impressive logical extension of the seriocomic romances (e.g., Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter, In Praise of the Stepmother) that are among his most appealing books. Read full book review >
NADA by Carmen Laforet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 13, 2007

"Poignant but not outstanding."
Published in 1944, now reissued in a new translation, this influential first novel by prize-winning Spanish author Laforet (1921–2004) describes one hellish year in the life of a young woman. Read full book review >
DANCING TO “ALMENDRA” by Mayra Montero
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"There's simply too much of everything. Montero captures the reader's attention, but the story flies apart before the reader can take hold of it."
Organized crime and disorganized personal relations are tightly intertwined in the prolific Cuban-born Puerto Rican author's latest (The Captain of the Sleepers, 2005, etc.). Read full book review >
MEMORIES OF MY MELANCHOLY WHORES by Gabriel García Márquez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 25, 2005

"You'll want to know what the 14-year-old, naked next to the 90-year-old man, sees when she looks at herself, but alas, it's never revealed."
An erotic novella from Colombian Nobel laureate García Márquez (Living to Tell the Tale, 2003, etc.), his first fiction in ten years. Read full book review >
CAPTAIN OF THE SLEEPERS by Mayra Montero
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2005

"She's one of Latin America's finest writers, and this is her best novel yet. "
An abortive revolution in postwar Puerto Rico parallels a family's unraveling in Cuban-born Montero's intricate 2002 novel (her sixth in English translation). Read full book review >
DEEP PURPLE by Mayra Montero
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 2, 2003

"The best yet from Montero (The Red of His Shadow, 2001, etc.)."
Music is the ultimate aphrodisiac in this aggressively sexy sixth novel from the Cuban-born author. Read full book review >
THE FEAST OF THE GOAT by Mario Vargas Llosa
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"A landmark in Latin American fiction."
The Peruvian master (The Notebooks of Don Rigoberto, 1998, etc.) now turns to the bloody reign (1930–61) of the Dominican Republic's dictatorial president Rafael Trujillo—and its aftermath. Read full book review >
THE RED OF HIS SHADOW by Mayra Montero
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 7, 2001

"Overdecorated and underplotted. Not up to Montero's usual standard."
The lush exoticism and sinister supernaturalism of the culture of voudou are evoked in rapturous detail in this unusual novel, the fourth in English translation from the Cuban-born Puerto Rican author (The Last Night I Spent with You, 2000, etc.). Read full book review >
MONSTRUARY by Julián Ríos
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 16, 2001

"So much fun to read that you may not notice how remarkably inventive and suggestive it is. Ríos is an authentic enchanter."
Another pun-derful literary extravaganza from the brilliant Spaniard making a name for himself as a contemporary equivalent of Joyce, Nabokov, and German experimentalist Arno Schmidt. Read full book review >
THE LAST NIGHT I SPENT WITH YOU by Mayra Montero
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2000

"An insouciantly witty celebration of the mingled folly and grandeur of physical love and its discontents. The best so far from one of Latin America's most impressive recent exports."
The Cuban-born author's fifth novel (and third in English translation, following In the Palm of Darkness, 19xx, and The Messenger, 19xx) depicts in profuse erotic detail the temptations to which a middle-aged married couple separately succumb during a Caribbean vacation voyage. Read full book review >
CARACOL BEACH by Eliseo Alberto
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2000

"Whether or not these characters grip us, we certainly understand their phlegmatic fatalism, encapsulated in the recurring sentence "God must know why the hell he does what he does." Presumably, Alberto does too, but you'd never know it from Caracol Beach."
Arbitrary whimsy and narrative fireworks are the order of two tense days in June in a hitherto sleepy Florida resort (the title town)—in this heavy-breathing 1998 novel by Cuban journalist and poet Alberto. Read full book review >
NEWS OF A KIDNAPPING by Gabriel García Márquez
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 4, 1997

"Garcia Marquez's consummate rendering of this hostage-taking looms as the symbol of an entire country held hostage to invisible yet violently ever-present drug lords."
In the same straightforward tone with which he relates the fabulous events of his fiction, Colombia's premier novelist presents the chillingly extraordinary events surrounding the 1992 abduction of ten prominent people by the Medellin drug cartel. Read full book review >
IN THE PALM OF DARKNESS by Mayra Montero
Released: May 1, 1997

"A refreshingly sophisticated treat. (Author tour)"
 In The Palm Of Darkness ($21.00; May 1997; 192 pp.; 0-06-018703- 4): A Cuban writers's intensely imaginative portrait of the extremities of Haitian culture rings some fresh changes on the overfamiliar theme of intellectual arrogance humbled by its collision with ``elemental'' peasant wisdom. Read full book review >
OF LOVE AND OTHER DEMONS by Gabriel García Márquez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 18, 1995

"Written with masterly economy, brimming with colorful episodes and vividly sketched characters: a haunting, cautionary tale that ranks among the author's best."
A bittersweet-comic version of all living things anchors this enchanting short novel by the acknowledged master of magical realism (Strange Pilgrims, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >
STRANGE PILGRIMS by Gabriel García Márquez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 21, 1993

"Garcia Marquez's generosity more than his effect-making is at deepest play in both- -and they do his career great credit."
Of the entire generation of Latin-American Boom writers, Garcia Marquez (The General and His Labyrinth, 1990, etc.) has shied away the most from writing about the expatriate experience he and his peers have so determinedly lived for decades. Read full book review >