DOLPHIN ISLAND - A STORY OF THE PEOPLE OF THE SEA

Johnny Clinton's adventures begin when the ship he has stowed away on sinks. Miraculously, two dolphins guide him to an island in the Australian territory. Johnny becomes close friends with a scientist who is devoting his life to experimentation and study of the "people of the sea" (his title for the intelligent dolphins). Johnny learns the art of skin diving quickly, becomes an asset to the scientist, and begins to think, live, dream dolphins. Mr. Clarke records the scientific discoveries and difficulties in accurate detail (much of it is only fiction and way beyond actual scientific discovery to date). The excitement of experimentation is emphasized, and therefore the book should appeal to both young scientists and adventure-seekers, although the readers may wish for more dialogue, less narration. Mr. Clarke is the author of Indian Ocean Adventure (1961, p. 684, J-246) and many adult stories of the deep; he has investigated the mysterious underwater regions himself.

Pub Date: March 18, 1963

ISBN: 0330247026

Page Count: 158

Publisher: Holt Rinehart & Winston

Review Posted Online: Sept. 21, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1963

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. AND THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON

This early reader is an excellent introduction to the March on Washington in 1963 and the important role in the march played by Martin Luther King Jr. Ruffin gives the book a good, dramatic start: “August 28, 1963. It is a hot summer day in Washington, D.C. More than 250,00 people are pouring into the city.” They have come to protest the treatment of African-Americans here in the US. With stirring original artwork mixed with photographs of the events (and the segregationist policies in the South, such as separate drinking fountains and entrances to public buildings), Ruffin writes of how an end to slavery didn’t mark true equality and that these rights had to be fought for—through marches and sit-ins and words, particularly those of Dr. King, and particularly on that fateful day in Washington. Within a year the Civil Rights Act of 1964 had been passed: “It does not change everything. But it is a beginning.” Lots of visual cues will help new readers through the fairly simple text, but it is the power of the story that will keep them turning the pages. (Easy reader. 6-8)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-448-42421-5

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2000

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