Books by Arthur C. Clarke

Arthur C. Clarke is considered to be the greatest science fiction writer of all time. He is an international treasure in many other ways: An article written by him in 1945 led to the invention of satellite technology. Books by Mr. Clarke--both fiction and


FIRSTBORN by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 26, 2007

"Readable, but more science travelogue than science fiction—and if you were anticipating a conclusion, or at least an alien encounter, forget it."
Wrapping up the Time Odyssey trilogy—according to the publishers anyway. The book's contents speak otherwise. Read full book review >
SUNSTORM by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 2005

"By the time the exposition-stuffed narrative gets around to reporting on the main event, few readers will care."
Hostile aliens intend to blow up the Sun and wipe humanity out in this sequel to Time's Eye, (2004), where one reappearing character, unlike anybody else, retains memories from the previous adventure. Read full book review >
TIME’S EYE by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 2004

"Curiously sloppy, with biographical contradictions and a rationale that's inconsistently applied: despite the many echoes of 2001, more spectacle than substance."
Second collaborative effort (The Light of Other Days, 2000) from these two individually famous authors, and first of a two-book series exploring the manipulation of time. Read full book review >
CHILDHOOD'S END by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 3, 2001

"An intelligent and imaginative use of cosmic concepts for a takeoff in time and space."
A futurama projects the end of the world when an invasion by the Overlords brings their unchallenged control of life on earth. Read full book review >
THE COLLECTED STORIES OF ARTHUR C. CLARKE by Arthur C. Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Wonder."
A massive compendium brings together (most probably) every story—104 in total, at least 3 previously uncollected—ever written by grandmaster Clarke (3001: The Final Odyssey, 1997, etc). Read full book review >
THE LIGHT OF OTHER DAYS by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 24, 2000

"Often chaotic but fizzing with ideas: one of those rare books you wish had been longer, with a more thorough exploration of the many fascinating issues it raises. ($250,000 ad/promo)"
This first collaborative effort from Clarke, the venerable author of 3001: The Final Odyssey (1997), etc., and the up-and-coming Baxter (Manifold: Time, Jan. 2000, etc.), exploits an old SF idea: a device that allows anyone to spy on anyone else, anywhere…and anytime. Read full book review >
THE TRIGGER by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 1999

"Heavy, preachy, and only intermittently absorbing: the authors get their message across, but it's about as subtle as a plummeting piano."
First collaboration from SF grandmaster Clarke (3001: The Final Odyssey, etc.) and Kube-McDowell (The Quiet Pools, 1990). Read full book review >
GREETINGS, CARBON-BASED BIPEDS! by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 25, 1999

"Essential Clarke; highly recommended."
A science fiction giant (3001: The Final Odyssey, 1997, and many others), Clarke has always been equally at home in nonfiction. Read full book review >
REACH FOR TOMORROW by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 13, 1998

"And there are personal tragedies as well: Nelson, after the shock of a generator, is laterally inverted, Connolly is haunted by a parasitic presence which drives him to his death; etc., etc. An unsettling- but diverting form of divination."
A new collection of short stories range forward in time and view a changing universe; old worlds die- and new civilizations replace them. Read full book review >
3001: THE FINAL ODYSSEY by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 12, 1997

"Clarke, while never uninteresting, long ago abandoned drama; here, he simply reports, with the dispassionate precision of HAL before he went bananas."
Fourth in Clarke's Odyssey series (2061: Odyssey Three, 1987, etc.). Read full book review >
RICHTER 10 by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1996

"Long-windedly un-Clarke-like but engagingly peopled, and, while improbable, never dull."
Collaboration between the veteran Clarke (The Hammer of God, 1993, etc.) and the late McQuay (Puppetmaster, 1991, etc.) about near-future earthquakes, politics, and environmental disaster. Read full book review >
RAMA REVEALED by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 15, 1994

"Still, there will be hordes of Rama fans desperate to discover how it all comes out."
Rendezvous with Rama didn't need sequels, but we got them anyway. Read full book review >
THE HAMMER OF GOD by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 15, 1993

"Stretched mighty thin—despite padding with docudrama snippets—but agreeably handled and sturdily credible."
Expansion of a short story (published in a fall 1992 issue of Time magazine) about the possibility of an asteroid colliding with Earth. Read full book review >
HOW THE WORLD WAS ONE by Arthur C. Clarke
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 15, 1992

"Little here is new—Clarke must be hoarse from repeating this message—but such a charming, pleasurable retelling of the societal unification myth is certainly worthwhile."
In a cheerful, if hardly startling, review, Clarke traces humankind's transformation from a mosaic of isolated states into a true global community—through modern communications-technology that began with the laying of the first submarine cables and continues to future visions of "talkmen" (Walkman-like telephones). Read full book review >
THE GARDEN OF RAMA by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 15, 1991

"Crude attempts to jumpstart the reader's sense of wonder with repeated insistence that the characters are awed, amazed, and overwhelmed by the rather routine vistas they encounter serve only to underline the lack of the genuine goods here."
Picking up where Rama II (1989) left off, this latest effort from Clarke and Lee is as disappointing as their others. Read full book review >
THE SANDS OF MARS by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1991

"Not completely gossamer."
SF novelization in which technicalities are subdued for story line so that even the uninitiated may comprehend. Read full book review >
GHOST FROM THE GRAND BANKS by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Nov. 15, 1990

"Average Clarke, more emotional than usual, with excellent extrapolation of future technologies."
Clarke returns to underwater exploration, a la The Deep Range, and Big Engineering, a la The Fountains of Paradise, in this story set in the first 12 years of the 21st century. Read full book review >
BEYOND THE FALL OF NIGHT by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 17, 1990

"So, Clarke's near-best has brought out the usually brilliant Benford's absolute worst—and the upshot is a project ill-conceived, ill-wrought, and irrelevant."
In Benford's case, beyond anything remotely in harmony with Clarke's far-future saga Against the Fall of Night (later reworked as the better 1956 novel, The City and the Stars). Read full book review >
TALES FROM PLANET EARTH by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 1990

"Dated in some respects, startlingly predictive in others: Clarke is never at the cutting edge here, but he is good company, and the rarities will make it a useful addition to collections and libraries."
A major retrospective, 1949-65, featuring 13 stories, several rarely if ever reprinted, and a 1987 fictional essay ("On Golden Seas") amusingly setting forth Clarke's disapproving views on Star Wars. Read full book review >
Released: March 1, 1990

"Charming—Clarke loves his subject, and it shows—and effortlessly informative while maintaining a perfect balance between affection and skepticism."
Clarke rambles nostalgically through the odd early days of the influential pulp science-fiction magazine, Astounding Tales of Super-Science, in a warmly appreciative yet far from uncritical tribute to sf's beginnings-cum-personal memoir. Read full book review >
CRADLE by Arthur C. Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1988

"Clarke's ideas often take wing, but here he's just muddling through."
Hard-working but mundane, near-future alien-visitor yam, as journalists, treasure-hunters, the US Navy, and alien super-robots mix it up beneath the sea off the Florida Keys. Read full book review >
SONGS OF DISTANT EARTH by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 12, 1987

"Still, there's much to admire here—not least Clarke's dream of civilization without fossilized hatreds and violence—and his vast audience won't be disappointed."
A short story that first appeared in 1958, expanded and polished to a high gloss. Read full book review >
2061 by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1987

"Indeed, Clarke, with an absorbing blend of scientific extrapolation and events that generate their own tension, has returned to something like Vintage form after years in the fictional doldrums."
Clarke's Odyssey yarns, like Herbert's Dune and Asimov's Foundation, have been self-perpetuating if, thus far, unimpressive. Read full book review >
ARTHUR C. CLARKE'S JULY 20, 2019 by Arthur C. Clarke
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Nov. 1, 1986

"This note of optimism and a long, Clarke-at-his-best description of life in a 2019 space station (based on present experience) lift the book out of the veil of joyless hardware."
The date is the 50th anniversary of the moonwalk, 17 years ago (ergo, 33 years hence). Read full book review >
PRELUDE TO SPACE by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 12, 1986

"Alexson's briefing takes him from London to the base in the desert of Australia where the Prometheus is to be launched; the extensive preparations, the screening of the crew, the ultimate objectives of the mission-all this forms a precise prospectus which is more science than fiction."
An astronautical documentary of the first rocket to the moon as it is recorded by Dirk Alexson, an historian assigned to the project. Read full book review >
1984: SPRING by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Feb. 17, 1983

"In all: a fragmented omnium-gatherum, disappointingly heavy with familiar items."
The title notwithstanding, this is not Clarke's answer to Orwell or a yeasty catalogue of predictions; rather, it's a collection of recent addresses, articles, and miscellany. Read full book review >
2010 ODYSSEY TWO by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Nov. 1, 1982

"Steady cosmic storytelling, then, short on drama but delivered with Clarke's usual boyish panache; and the many 2001 followers will regard it as compulsory reading."
A slick, tame sequel that extensively recaps and updates the original 2001—but betters it only in the nuts-and-bolts department. Read full book review >
THE FOUNTAINS OF PARADISE by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 29, 1978

"Not much of a novel, but the idea is one of Clarke's most captivating."
Characteristic Clarke—and parts of it are excellent. Read full book review >
THE VIEW FROM SERENDIP by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Oct. 17, 1977

Reading Arthur Clarke is exhilarating, to say the least. Read full book review >
IMPERIAL EARTH by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 19, 1975

"Pleasant but oddly unformed."
As colonists from the entire solar system converge on the mother planet for the 2776 celebration, Duncan Makenzie—third of a "father-son" dynasty of clones—returns to Earth. Read full book review >
RENDEZVOUS WITH RAMA by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 7, 1973

"A perfect science fiction novel."
Only superlatives will do for Arthur Clarke's dazzlingly polished, wonderfully original exploration of a gigantic alien space ship that passes briefly through the solar system on its way to an unimaginable destination. Read full book review >
THE WIND FROM THE SUN by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: April 19, 1972

"Perhaps the 2001th version of previously charted journeys but steady, reliable, and efficient."
There are one or two chips off the old monolith (a spectacular encounter with the "Outer Giants" of Space and some strange transformations; an amusing theological/galactic speculation) but most of these short stories involve familiar machinery, stranded heroes, and electronic or deep-marine monsters. Read full book review >
INTO SPACE  by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 1, 1971

An extensively revised edition of Clarke's Going Into Space (1954), with new chapters on space stations and "harvests of space" (benefits incurred from space exploration to date). Read full book review >
REPORT ON PLANET THREE AND OTHER SPECULATIONS by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 12, 1971

"A very disarming lightyear."
This is not major nor new Arthur Clarke but it's Arthur Clarke all the same and that's enough to give devotees galactic goosebumps in that space between their 2001 ears — yes, Son of Dr. Strangelove: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Stanley Kubrick (and the sequel) is included here. Read full book review >
THE PROMISE OF SPACE by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 5, 1968

"Publication is aimed to coincide with the release of the Clarke-Kubrick production, 2001: A Space Odyssey."
The Promise of Space is written for the same intelligent laymen the author had in mind in The Exploration of Space (1951) "all those who are interested in the 'why' and 'how' of astronautics, yet do not wish to go into too many scientific details." Read full book review >
THE NINE BILLION NAMES OF GOD by Arthur C. Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 3, 1967

Clarke has written over a hundred short stories, most of which have been anthologized before. Read full book review >
THE COMING OF THE SPACE AGE by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: April 1, 1967

"Excitement inherent in the subject and the challenge of its concepts should appeal."
On October 4, 1957, the rehearsal of a Philharmonic orchestra about to launch Peter and the Wolf suddenly stopped as its members quietly withdrew. Read full book review >
TIME PROBE by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: May 25, 1966

"Timely probing."
Eleven different sciences are represented in these short stories: Robert Heinlein uses math to build a remarkably inconvenient Crooked House; Murray Leinster startles with a cybernetic superweapon in The Wabbler; Theodore Thomas ponders the wondrous ways of The Weather Man when he can do more than just talk about it...an out-standing effort. Read full book review >
Released: June 1, 1965

Subtitled "An Omnibus," this collection contains the author's early classic Prelude to Space and his later novel The Sands of Mars along with sixteen short stories on both the "light" and the "dark" side of space. Read full book review >
COAST OF CORAL by Arthur C. Clarke
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 1, 1965

"A chapter on photographic techniques for the experts."
The account of a "rather small underwater expedition" (the author and his companion, Mike Wilson) in 1954-55 to the Great Barrier Reef of the eastern seaboard of Australia is a bit of all right, even in heavy competition. Read full book review >
INDIAN OCEAN TREASURE by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Aug. 1, 1964

"It is still not finished, promising another good book."
Sunken treasure and skin-diving are a sure-fire combination for reader interest. Read full book review >
THE TREASURE OF THE GREAT REEF by Arthur C. Clarke
HISTORY
Released: March 11, 1964

"Much of the treasure is still down there waiting for Wilson, while much of the mystery surrounding the ship is slowly rising."
Readers of Indian Ocean Adventure, which Clarke wrote with Mike Wilson, will remember Clarke's skin-diving adventures along the Great Reef off of Ceylon. Read full book review >
GLIDE PATH by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 11, 1963

"The electronic saga sometimes pops with a bit of poetry and sentiment, but for the most part it is told in the tone of hardy idealism rarely encountered in today's fiction. We'll to the stars no more"
The story is something of a hymn to a home-based British radar unit during WW II and concerns the development of a radar talk-down system for landing planes. Read full book review >
DOLPHIN ISLAND - A STORY OF THE PEOPLE OF THE SEA by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: March 18, 1963

"684, J-246) and many adult stories of the deep; he has investigated the mysterious underwater regions himself."
Johnny Clinton's adventures begin when the ship he has stowed away on sinks. Read full book review >
TALES OF TEN WORLDS by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Sept. 12, 1962

"An area with too much heat; the first baby born in space; kittens in a spaceship locker; a dead astronaut; an abacus saving men when machines fail; an ape excelling in painting; death by astronomy; crime on Mars; a killing by sunlight — these vary theme and telling satisfactorily."
Three handsful (well, 15) collected from Clarke's magazine appearances wander from a dog's warning to his master to misty conception of worlds to vanish, and offer a kaleidoscope of matters beyond human ken. Read full book review >
PROFILES OF THE FUTURE by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 15, 1962

"Further, he systematizes nothing; there are no socio-cultural parallels drawn; man, as we've known him, vanishes completely in this gala inquiry into the limits of the possible."
Arthur Clarke is the high lama of science fiction and non-fiction; as an astrophysicist he wrote The Exploration of Space; with a Wellsian imagination he concocted Childhood's End. Read full book review >
INDIAN OCEAN ADVENTURE by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Oct. 11, 1961

"MPSLUGMISTER Clarke's amazing yet fully credible account will be brilliantly illustrated with the photographs he brought home and in its modest, low pitched style it is sure to capture new adherents to the undersea way of life, be they only simple in waters."
A prolific writer and an esteemed underwater explorer has recorded one of his most fascinating adventures in the largest unexplored region of our planet, the Indian Ocean. Read full book review >
FALL OF MOONDUST by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Sept. 13, 1961

"Able science-fiction here."
Captain Harris of the Selene faces the question of rescuing 22 people when the airboat sinks into the sea of dust on the Moon. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 25, 1961

A collection of three titles, The Deep Range (1957), The Other Side of the Sky (1958) and The City and the Stars (1956) offers two novels and 24 short stories. Read full book review >
THE CHALLENGE OF THE SEA by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Sept. 26, 1960

"Many interesting projections into future sea life are indicated here in this lucid and stimulating text which will be equally enjoyed in school and home libraries."
At a moment where interplanetary travel is the focal point of man's pioneering vision, the author, twice Chairman of the British Interplanetary Society, turns downward. Read full book review >
THE FIRST FIVE FATHOMS by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: March 16, 1960

"With skin diving reaching ever greater dimensions of popularity, this illustrated book is both informative and inviting and should appeal to any reader who in any form enjoys water sports."
As the first five fathoms—approximately thirty feet—are the most vivid and the most accessible to man, this excellent text on diving restricts itself to that area of underwater life. Read full book review >
THE CHALLENGE OF THE SPACESHIP by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: June 15, 1959

"This has broader appeal than his other books which are already standbys in bookstores and libraries."
Twenty articles concerning the impact of the coming space age on mankind written by the former chairman of the British Interplanetary Society and one of the most imaginative, scientifically oriented writers of space literature today. Read full book review >
THE MAKING OF A MOON by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Aug. 7, 1957

"The facts he covers are superficially close to Caidin's selection, but the approach and emphasis are unrecognizably altered in the direction of seriousness, analysis and inquiry."
Comparing Clarke's version of the satellite a-making to Caiden's version (Vanguard! page 405) the differences are substantial enough to warrant the reading of both. Read full book review >
THE REEFS OF TAPROBANE by Arthur C. Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1957

"What is known as a pleasure to read."
A most amiable continuation of this author's previous The Coast Of Coral (1956) here brings him back from that expedition and starts him off on one that takes him to Ceylon and the waters on its north, east, south and west — and over the land itself. Read full book review >
THE DEEP RANGE by Arthur C. Clarke
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 20, 1957

"At the end he injects a conservation-vegetarian angle which takes a bit away from the straight adventure aspects."
The price precludes this being listed as science fiction, so let's call it science fiction de luxe. Read full book review >
THE OTHER SIDE OF THE SKY by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Feb. 3, 1957

"Good."
In book form, a select selection of shorter pieces includes The Star (voted the best science fiction piece of 1956) in which the ruins of a dead continent and civilization are revealed- only to frame another unanswerable question; the title constellation of six pieces dealing with space stations; the Venture to the Moon undertaken by an American, a British and a Russian space ship- and the subsequent sequels to the landing there, etc. These and others deal largely with extraterrestial excursions which assume a greater reality now, and offer a legible, believable form of skywriting. Read full book review >
GOING INTO SPACE by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Oct. 6, 1954

"Turning skyward he analyzes the atmosphere, the planets and their positions in the universe, the work now going on for flight to them, and what may happen when man gets to the moon."
Another round-up of the outlook, probabilities and possibilities of present and future space travel- by the chairman of the British Interplanetary Society and a science fiction writer-makes its bid as an authoritative book in a popular, growing market ( Charles Coombs' book reported below). Read full book review >
EXPEDITION TO EARTH by Arthur C. Clarke
Released: Dec. 14, 1953

"Breaking Strain views the problem of survival in a doomed space ship, a Walt Disney film baffles a future world, Earth obeys but conquers Mars, etc. Imaginative, challenging and literate."
Eleven short stories concern themselves generally with the river of time. Read full book review >