WARRIORS, WIGMEN, AND THE CROCODILE PEOPLE by Barbara A. Margolies

WARRIORS, WIGMEN, AND THE CROCODILE PEOPLE

Journeys in Papua New Guinea
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KIRKUS REVIEW

 Striking color photos and a brief text provide tantalizing glimpses of two remote and unusual cultures; but since little effort is made to compare them, the reader is left with compelling but fleeting images of the bizarre and beautiful, rather than an understanding of either. The Huli of the southern highlands separate men and women, and each gender has specialized roles. Photos show men with stunning headdresses decorated with hair, bone, feathers and flowers, their faces vividly painted and patterned. The people of the Sepik River live in houses built on stilts, using the river for food and transport. Ornate carvings, ritual scarification, and ceremonial song and dance festivals called Sing Sings typify their culture. The author, who has traveled to other remote areas for her photo essays (Kanu of Kathmandu, 1992) captures some splendid images, but remains a tourist. (Nonfiction. 10)

Pub Date: April 30th, 1993
ISBN: 0-02-762283-5
Page count: 40pp
Publisher: Four Winds/MacMillan
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1st, 1993