LEAF BY LEAF

AUTUMN POEMS

There’s a marvelous sense of composition to this attractive volume: the pictures and the poetry are tightly bound together in image and evocation. The poems, mostly short excerpts, look at the season of autumn in all of its aspects, and the poets range from Robert Browning, Shelley, and Gerard Manley Hopkins to Marge Piercy, Amy Lowell, and Tzu Yeh. The language in each case is concrete and visual enough to rouse the spirit of children being read to; older children will delight in reading aloud themselves. Both will find the images in the poems made visible in the photographs. A particularly fine approach is the use of urban and rural autumnal images, and Tauss’s pictures use color, sepia, and black and white with suppleness and ingenuity. Walt Whitman’s excerpt from “come up from the fields father” floats over an almost Victorian image of a child with a cornucopia. William Ernest Henley’s four-line excerpt “For earth and sky and air / Are golden everywhere, / And golden with a gold so suave and fine / The looking on it lifts the heart like wine” shows a beautiful old building reflected upside-down in a glass ball, the whole suffused with burnished light. Despite the occasional difficulty in reading the text over the pictures, Henley’s quote could apply to these lovely images. (Poetry. 5-9)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-590-25347-6

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2001

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

HONEY, I LOVE

Iffy art cramps this 25th-anniversary reissue of the joyful title poem from Greenfield’s first collection (1978), illustrated by the Dillons. As timeless as ever, the poem celebrates everything a child loves, from kissing Mama’s warm, soft arm to listening to a cousin from the South, “ ’cause every word he says / just kind of slides out of his mouth.” “I love a lot of things / a whole lot of things,” the narrator concludes, “And honey, / I love ME, too.” The African-American child in the pictures sports an updated hairstyle and a big, infectious grin—but even younger viewers will notice that the spray of cool water that supposedly “stings my stomach” isn’t aimed there, and that a comforter on the child’s bed changes patterns between pages. More problematic, though, is a dropped doll that suddenly acquires a horrified expression that makes it look disturbingly like a live baby, and the cutesy winged fairy that hovers over the sleeping child in the final scene. The poem deserves better. (Picture book/poetry. 6-8)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2003

ISBN: 0-06-009123-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Amistad/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2002

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

For places where the first-grade shelves are particularly thin.

ON THE FIRST DAY OF FIRST GRADE

The traditional song “The Twelve Days of Christmas” gets a school makeover as readers follow a cheery narrator through the first 12 days of first grade.

“On the first day of first grade / I had fun right away // laughing and learning all day!” In these first two spreads, Jennings shows the child, who has brown skin and a cloud of dark-brown hair, entering the schoolyard with a diverse array of classmates and settling in. In the backgrounds, caregivers, including a woman in hijab, stand at the fence and kids hang things on hooks in the back of the room. Each new day sees the child and their friends enjoying new things, previous days’ activities repeated in the verses each time so that those listening will soon be chiming in. The child helps in the classroom, checks out books from the library, plants seeds, practices telling time and counting money, leads the line, performs in a play, shows off a picture of their pet bunny, and does activities in gym, music, and art classes. The Photoshop-and-watercolor illustrations portray adorable and engaged kids having fun while learning with friends. But while the song and topic are the same, this doesn’t come close to touching either the hysterical visuals or great rhythm of Deborah Lee Rose and Carey Armstong-Ellis’ The Twelve Days of Kindergarten (2003).

For places where the first-grade shelves are particularly thin. (Picture book. 5-7)

Pub Date: June 19, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-06-266851-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more